HomeFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in
Search
 
 

Display results as :
 
Rechercher Advanced Search
Latest topics

Share | 
 

 What I've just watched

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : Previous  1 ... 15 ... 26, 27, 28, 29, 30  Next
AuthorMessage
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Oct 21, 2009 3:13 am

Sorry! It's definitely a film that deserves to be seen again, so maybe I'll like it more then.

_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
JD
Massive Supreme Being!
Massive Supreme Being!
avatar

Posts : 390
Join date : 2008-07-22
Age : 31
Location : Gotham City

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Oct 21, 2009 12:15 pm

I hope so, because 1 minute of Zombieland is 100% better than the whole of The Happening, or Mummy Dragon Emperor Rolling Eyes
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Oct 21, 2009 1:58 pm

Yeah, Zombieland's little cameo was brilliant and hilarious!! Anyways...

RocknRolla (2008), for the first time since the low points of Swept Away (2002) and Revolver (2005), Guy Ritchie rediscovers his mojo, and could put him in good stead for the future. It involves a property development scam going on, two streetwise gangsters One Two (Gerard Butler) and Mumbles (Idris Elba) end up owing money to local underworld kingpin Lenny Cole (Tom Wilkinson), so they decide to steal the money from another deal Cole has going on with Russian billionaire Uri (Karel Roden), and Uri's lucky painting goes missing as well, and Cole's druggie rockstar step-son Johnny Quid (Toby Kebbell), persumed dead, gets involved as well. Ritchie has made up for the sins of his last 2 films, got it together and makes a good piece of entertainment. True, there's nothing very original about the film, but it makes for a good piece of entertainment for nearly a couple of hours. Butler makes a good gangster, but Wilkinson makes a better slaphead crime magnate. Ritchie also has a sequel planned, but first he's gonna do Sherlock Holmes, and on the strength of this, he'll do well with it!! :Wink: 4/5



Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964), writer/director and actor Bryan Forbes made alot of good British films in the 1960's, including Whistle Down The Wind and The League of Gentlemen. Here, he adapted a novel by Mark McShane. A creepy, noirish drama about how far people will go to get money and even publicity. Set in South London, it has Myra Savage (Kim Stanley), a fake medium who holds some quite convincing seances in her old fashioned house. She has something else in mind though, and she convinces her weak-willed, asthmatic husband Bill (Richard Attenborough, who also produced the film), to kidnap the daughter of a rich couple, ((Mark Eden and Nanette Newman), and keep the daughter in a room in the house disguised as a hospital ward. Myra offers her services to the couple, who are scornful of her offer for help, but the mother takes her up on it. But, Bill feels guilty for what they've done, and Myra becomes more unstable as time goes on. It's a moody, atmospheric film, with a brilliant performance from Stanley as the bogus medium, her channelling at the seances are quite scary. Attenborough makes a good husband, who knows he's doing wrong, but is bullied into doing wrong. It's all topped off with an eerie score by John Barry. It's a wonder no-one has tried to remake this. 3.5/5



The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), Wes Anderson's third film, and his first one made outside his native Texas. This is a huge ensemble piece with an all star cast made in New York, it's well made, and it has Anderson's usual flair for odd visuals and camerawork, but it has heart, emotion and humour. It begins with the Tenenbaum family, father Royal (Gene Hackman) and mother Etheline (Anjelica Huston), who have 3 gifted children who were brilliant child prodigies, but they found failure and hardship in later years. Chas (Ben Stiller) was a brilliant financial whiz, but has since become a widower, very over-protective of his two sons, Azi and Uzi. Margot (Gwyneth Paltrow) was a brilliant playwright, but now she spends 6 hours a day in the bathtub, her husband is neurologist Raleigh St. Clair (Bill Murray), and Richie (Luke Wilson) was a brilliant tennis pro, who now sails around the world. Royal has been estranged from this family for years, is determined to get them back together again, by any means necessary. It's very offbeat, but everything Anderson has done before and after has been. It's got a dry, old-fashioned narration by Alec Baldwin, and the cast are brilliant, (also including Danny Glover, Kumar Pallana and Owen Wilson) It's quite dark and depressing in places, but once you get past that, it's an enjoyable and entertaining film. 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
JD
Massive Supreme Being!
Massive Supreme Being!
avatar

Posts : 390
Join date : 2008-07-22
Age : 31
Location : Gotham City

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Oct 21, 2009 2:24 pm

Donald McKinney wrote:
Yeah, Zombieland's little cameo was brilliant and hilarious!! Anyways...

That could well be not only the funniest scene in a film all year, but the best cameo ever Cool
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Oct 21, 2009 11:14 pm

JD wrote:
Donald McKinney wrote:
Yeah, Zombieland's little cameo was brilliant and hilarious!! Anyways...

That could well be not only the funniest scene in a film all year, but the best cameo ever Cool

I agree, and I've found a new respect for this actor for being so game to do it. Plus, he and Woody Harrelson worked together before, do you know which film it was?? Wink
Back to top Go down
View user profile
JD
Massive Supreme Being!
Massive Supreme Being!
avatar

Posts : 390
Join date : 2008-07-22
Age : 31
Location : Gotham City

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Thu Oct 22, 2009 2:44 am

Kingpin cheers
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Thu Oct 22, 2009 3:26 am

JD wrote:
I hope so, because 1 minute of Zombieland is 100% better than the whole of The Happening, or Mummy Dragon Emperor Rolling Eyes

And Speed Racer! Very Happy

Glad you liked Seance On A Wet Afternoon, Donnie, I saw it earlier in the year and it turned out to be an unexpected gem of a film.

_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
JD
Massive Supreme Being!
Massive Supreme Being!
avatar

Posts : 390
Join date : 2008-07-22
Age : 31
Location : Gotham City

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Thu Oct 22, 2009 10:29 am

Speed Racers not so bad, but Zombieland is way better Very Happy
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Fri Oct 23, 2009 8:22 pm

Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009), Wes Anderson takes on Roald Dahl, and he does it with a primitive looking stop-motion animation, a step back from what you've seen with Aardman or even anything Tim Burton has worked on. The result is a likeable and unusual film, although you can see alot of Dahl's influence here, it's unmistakenly a Wes Anderson film through and through, and that's a good thing!! Very Happy Set in an old-fashioned looking England, it has Mr. Fox (George Clooney) moving into a tree on a hill with his family, Mrs. Fox (Meryl Streep), son Ash (Jason Schwartzman) and their nephew Kristofferson (Eric Chase Anderson). But, he goes off on one last raid with possum Kylie (Wally Wolodarsky) to raid the stock of farmers Boggis, Bunce and Bean. But, when they ambush him and try to dig him out. They team up with other animals to try and get their own back on the farmers. It's a very unusual looking film, many will be put off by the animals with American accents. But, don't let that put you off, it's still a very enjoyable film, full of the usual quirks and humour that we've come to expect from Wes Anderson. The supporting vocal cast, including Bill Murray, Willem Dafoe, Owen Wilson and Michael Gambon are very enjoyable, and the soundtrack is the icing on a different kind of cake indeed!! Very Happy 4/5



Dead Man Walking (1995), Tim Robbins is well known as a reliable and talented actor, here he stepped behind the camera for this true life drama. His second film as director after his folk-rock political mockumentary Bob Roberts (1992), but here, he shows great maturity as a director, and even gets some powerful and engaging performances from his two leads. Based on a true story, written by Sister Helen Prejean, played here by Susan Sarandon (who won an Oscar for her performance), who finds herself befriending convicted murderer Matthew Poncelet (Sean Penn), who has been on Death Row for 6 years for the murder of a teenage couple with an accomplice, who received a lighter sentence because he could afford a better lawyer. Poncelet appeals to Sister Helen, claiming he didn't do it, and wants to appeal against his sentence. Sister Helen agrees to help, but she soons learns the truth of what really happened, and she faces criticism for being with Poncelet. It's a film which packs a big powerful emotional punch, Sarandon is brilliant as Sister Helen, and Penn is equally as good as the convicted Poncelet. One the strength of this, it's a pity Robbins hasn't directed more films, as he shows such confidence here. He did do Cradle Will Rock (1999) after this, but nothing since. Pity really. 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Sat Oct 24, 2009 9:07 am

The Ballad of Cable Hogue(1st view) - I generally don't like Sam Peckinpah's films all that much. I can't see anything special about The Wild Bunch, can take or leave Straw Dogs and Cross Of Iron, was bored silly by Junior Bonner and hate Pat Garret and Billy The Kid. So the fact that I loved this was a very pleasant surprise. Jason Robards was fantastic and I really wish I could get hold of the songs from the film, something else that's surprising as I often don't like tunes written for westerns. Along with The Innocents and Seance On A Wet Afternoon, this is one of the best unexpected gems I've come across this year- 4/5*




Grow Your Own (1st view) - Comedy drama that's set on a Merseyside allotment, which I'm guessing is quite a rare location for a film to take place. hardly one of the best films ever made but it's very easy to like - 4/5*




California Man (1st view) - The more films I see Sean Astin in the more I'm convinced that LOTR is the only decent thing he's done - 2/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Mon Oct 26, 2009 7:32 pm

The Man With The Golden Gun (1974), the 9th James Bond film, Roger Moore's second and adapted from Ian Fleming's final Bond book. The humour is increased, even if Moore's Bond does seem a bit moody and savage at time, closer to Connery's Bond. But, the films saving grace is one of the best Bond villians of them all. James Bond (Moore) is sent a bullet with 007 engraved into it from Scaramanga (Christopher Lee), a ruthless hitman who charges $1 million a hit, and he uses a novel device, a Golden Gun, made from a pen, a cigarette lighter and a cufflink, plus he uses golden bullets. This mission takes Bond to Macau, where Scaramanga's golden bullets are made, to Hong Kong, where Scaramanga steals a Solex Agitator, used for harnessing solar energy, Bond follows him to Thailand and to his home in the South China Sea, along with Mary Goodnight, (Britt Ekland). The film is trying to cash in on the recent craze of kung-fu films coming out at the time, it's a flawed film, with plotholes galore. It feels rushed and the camp overtones were a warning things to come from Bond. But, it's still fun while it lasts.. 3/5



The Rainbow (1989), 20 years after the release of Women of Love (1969), which had put Ken Russell on the map as a director, and won Glenda Jackson an Oscar. Russell returned to D.H. Lawrence's work, and took on his 1915 book, (published 5 years before Women in Love), The Rainbow. It is a very good film, with some good performances and visually amazing with it's locations and oddities we've all come to expect from Ken. Razz It focuses on the young life of Ursula Brangwen (Sammi Davis), who lives with her father Will (Christopher Gable) and mother Anna (Glenda Jackson, playing the mother of the character she played in Women in Love) and her brothers and sisters. Ursula is courting soldier Anton Skrebensky (Paul McGann) and she has a lesbian love affair with her teacher Winifred Inger (Amanda Donohoe), who eventually marries Ursula's Uncle Henry (David Hemmings). Ursula gets a job as a schoolteacher, but finds misery from the schoolkids and headmaster (Jim Carter). It's good that Ken returned to do this as a prequel to the film that made him a household name, in terms of story and structure, it's not as good as Women in Love, but there's good performances on display here, (Davis is wonderful, as is Donohoe), and typical of Ken, there's alot of nudity on display!! Razz 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Tue Oct 27, 2009 12:41 pm

Twilight (1998), from Oscar-winning writer/director Robert Benton (Kramer Vs. Kramer), comes this old-fashioned noirish thriller, with a great cast. It's good to see something made like this when alot of other films have added sex, violence and bad language. While this has them, it keeps them at an arms length, and doesn't use them gratuitously. Set in Los Angeles, it has retired cop and now private detective Harry Ross (Paul Newman) living with his friend and actor Jack Ames (Gene Hackman), who is slowly dying from cancer, and Jack's wife Catherine (Susan Sarandon), and their daughter Mel (Reese Witherspoon) who accidentally injured Harry a couple of years earlier when he tried to get her back from a lowlife boyfriend. When Harry is asked to deliver some blackmail money for Jack, he finds himself in the middle of a 20 year old case involving the disappearance of Catherine's first husband, he suspects that Catherine and Jack know alot more than they let on. It's a slow-burning thriller, but at the same time, it doesn't outstay it's welcome. The cast are wonderful, Newman is as cool and suave as ever, and Sarandon makes for a good femme fatale. Quite an underrated and little seen modern film noir, it deserves a look. 4/5



Melvin and Howard (1980), from director Jonathan Demme, years before he found Oscar success with The Silence of the Lambs, comes this touching and amusing little comedy/drama based on a true story, or is it?? It's a story so unbelieveable and out of the ordinary, it could actually be true, but alot of people don't seem to think it is, but who knows. The film makes it seem convincing. It begins with down-and-out loser Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat), who picks up a ragged old man in the Nevada desert, who claims to be billionaire Howard Hughes (Jason Robards), Melvin drops him off at the Sands Hotel, Las Vegas. Melvin goes back to his life, and has a rocky marriage to Lynda (Mary Steenburgen, who won an Oscar for this film), and after squandering the money she won on a game show, she leaves him, he goes to work in a gas station. Then, he receives a will, in which Howard Hughes allegedly leaves $156 million to Melvin, but is the will genuine?? It's an amusing little story, even if the extended 2nd act between how Melvin met Howard, and how he received the will does drag on a bit. It's a very likeable and offbeat film, and it has some good performances throughout. (Whatever happened to Paul Le Mat??) Plus, Charles Napier and Dabney Coleman are in it!! Very Happy 3.5/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Oct 28, 2009 4:24 pm

Mr. Brooks (2007), Kevin Costner's career has been chequered as of late, but he can still make good choices. Open Range was one example, and this is another one. Directed by writer Bruce A. Evans, (best known for writing slightly lighter films such as Starman, Kuffs and erm... Cutthroat Island.) But, this is a good serial killer film with a different kind of feel and structure, but it's suspense and tension keep you gripped throughout. It has Earl Brooks (Costner), a rich, successful businessman in Portland, Oregon, with a loving wife Emma (Marg Helgenberger) and teenage daughter Jane (Danielle Panabaker). However, Mr. Brooks is a serial killer, spurred on by his id Marshall (William Hurt). However, one of Mr. Brooks' murders is witnessed by Mr. Bafford (Dane Cook), an amateur photographer who attempts to blackmail Mr. Brooks under the alias of Mr. Smith, and wants to join Brooks on his next hit. However, local Detective Tracy Atwood (Demi Moore) is investigating the murders, and is one step behind them. This film has alot of parallels with Dexter, having an addiction to killing but also meticulous in detail. But, this is much darker, and it is taut and uncomfortable. This is one of Costner's best films in years, proof he can still make good choices, and the support from Cook, Hurt and Moore are very good. 4/5



You're A Big Boy Now (1966), years before The Godfather, Francis Ford Coppola was able to break into the seemingly impenetrable Hollywood studio system. His debut was Dementia 13 (1963) a cheap horror done in Ireland for Roger Corman, however he made a bigger film here, and it showed potential of things to come. Even if Coppola got too big for his ego, it's smaller, personal films like this, The Rain People (1969) and The Conversation (1974) that rank amongst his most interesting works. Set in New York, it follows the exploits of Bernard Chanticleer (Peter Kastner), a hen-pecked 19 year old who works for his father, I. H. Chanticleer (Rip Torn) at a big library in the city, and his mother Margery (Geraldine Page) is still clinging on to him. However, Bernard is determined to grow up, and show he can survive out in the big wide world. He finds himself falling for Barbara Darling (Elizabeth Hartman), and trying to woo her, even if he's hopeless with girls. It's a light and breezy enough affair. It's dated a bit, but it remains a good timepiece of mid-1960's America. The humour is a bit clumsy, (alot of it echoes what Woody Allen did shortly after with Bananas.) But, it passes by... 3/5



Strange Days (1995), written and produced by James Cameron, and directed by his ex-wife Kathryn Bigelow, (best known for directing Near Dark and Point Break), comes this complex and quite confusing thriller, but it's trying to be a thinkpiece, but it gets caught caught up in it's own complexities. But, the action, when it does come along, is fun to watch. There's too many ideas on display, which is a shame, as alot of them do work, but the plot weighs them down. Set in December 1999, where Los Angeles, and indeed much of America has become a police state, where tensions between the police and the public have reached a high. It has street hustler Lenny Nero (Ralph Fiennes) who deals in 'SQUID' recordings, which are recordings of what people see, recorded onto MiniDiscs, (that dates the film!! Razz) The murder of rapper Jeriko One (Glenn Plummer), who was critical of the police brutality comes with it's own SQUID recording, which could bring down the police state, so Lenny and bodyguard friend Lornette "Mace" Mason (Angela Bassett) try to get the tape seen so that the police can be brought down. It's quite confusing at first, but once you get into it, it is quite enjoyable. But, it's too long even to contain all it's ideas, but it's fun while it lasts, and Ralph Fiennes makes a good if unlikely action hero. 3/5



9 (2009), in 2005, visual effects animator Shane Acker did a little short film called 9, which eventually got nominated for an Oscar. The short caught the attention of Tim Burton, who offered to produce a big-screen version of 9, Acker agreed, and Night Watch and Wanted director Timur Bekmambetov also joined up to produce the film. It's very original in it's look, and it's proof that not all CGI animated films have to be for children, it's very gloomy and moody. Think of it as WALL•E refiltered through steampunk, and you have the general idea. Set in an alternate history, where World War 2 was dominated by big robots, it begins with a humanoid ragdoll called 9 (Elijah Wood) waking up to discover this dangerous world, and he soon finds other ragdolls just like him, including caring engineer 5 (John C. Reilly), self-appointed leader 1 (Christopher Plummer), eccentric visionary 6 (Crispin Glover) and brave warrior 7 (Jennifer Connelly). They try to survive when there are machines out to get them. It's plot and structure is almost the sort of thing Hayao Miyazaki would come up with, but it's unlikely he would ever do something as dark as this, (then again, maybe not). But, it's very inventive and has some good ideas to it's nature, and Shane Acker is someone to keep an eye on, he may just go far!! 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Thu Oct 29, 2009 3:19 pm

Get Real (1999), a low-budget British film which won awards at loads of various film festivals around the world, it should have put it's director Simon Shore, it's writer Patrick Wilde and it's young cast on the map as the next big things of British cinema. It sadly didn't turn out that way, this enjoyed a brief success, then it vanished and everyone forgot about it. Talk about having 15 minutes of fame. Set in Basingstoke, this focuses on the young, troubled life of Steven Carter (Ben Silverstone), a 16-year-old schoolboy who just so happens to be a homosexual, but is having trouble with coming out to those he knows well. Plus, he gets picked on at school and he is a social misfit, but he finds solace with his next door neighbour Linda (Charlotte Brittain). However, things become even more complicated when the school's head boy and sports star John Dixon (Brad Gorton). Steve and John fall for each other, and have a relationship, knowing they have to keep it quiet because no-one would believe it. It's a touching romance film, different from the rest. And it does make a serious point about people's narrow-mindedness towards homosexuality and how hard it is for some to cope with it. Quite thought provoking too. 3/5



Once (2006), here's a little film that could. Made for a meagre $160,000, it would eventually gross $20 million worldwide. It's a touching love story, made by writer/director John Carney, who was in the Irish rock band The Frames, he got his bandmate to be in the film as well as their young Czech female collaberator to be in it too. Set in Dublin, it has Guy (Glen Hansard), a busker who works in a vacuum cleaner and struggles busking on the street. One night, he's performing, and Girl (Markéta Irglová), is drawn in by his music, and the two start a sort of relationship, and he teaches her some of the songs he's written. Although Guy's father (Bill Hodnett) is indifferent to Guy's music, he accepts it. Guy and Girl write music together, and they even book some studio time together, it seems like a perfect relationship, until Girl drops a bombshell which puts a damper on their blossoming relationship and aspiring relationship. It's a short but sweet film, the music in it is very good. The romance in the film is also touching and the two leads are also very engaging, they even got to go on The Simpsons a year or so back, so they did something right. 3/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Fri Oct 30, 2009 12:08 am

Lone Star (1996), from John Sayles, who did the scripts for Joe Dante's Piranha and The Howling, comes this dark, all-star crime thriller set in a Texas border town. Which is effectively a modern day western. In fact, with it's tone and structure, it predates No Country for Old Men by a decade, but despite all the critical acclaim, hardly anyone went to see this one, although it broke even financially. The film is a study of interracial tensions in Rio County, Texas. When the human remains of sheriff Charlie Wade (Kris Kristofferson) are found, current sheriff Sam Deeds (Chris Cooper) pieces together a complex case of how and why Wade was murdered. Over 30 years earlier, Deeds was a hardened, bigotted sheriff who was feared by many in his juristiction. There's also alot of speculation that Sam's father, Buddy Deeds (Matthew McConaughey) had murdered him, but there's evidence to suggest otherwise. Sam also finds himself rekindling himself with former flame Pilar Cruz (Elizabeth Peña), who is father forbade from seeing. It's a moody and suspenseful piece, but it's well written and it shows that Sayles is a bit of an underrated talent, but this makes for a good murder mystery. The film also has a brilliant supporting cast too including Joe Morton, Clifton James, Gordon Tootoosis and Frances McDormand. 4/5



The World According To Garp (1982), based on John Irving's 1978 novel, adapted for the screen by Oscar winning director George Roy Hill. It was also a change for Robin Williams to show off his acting chops, and that there was much more to him than playing an alien buffoon on Mork and Mindy. It shows promise of what Williams could later do, but the supporting cast did better. The film focuses on the exploits and slighty off-kilter life of T.S. Garp (Williams), who was born to feminist writer and nurse Jenny Fields (Glenn Close), who got herself pregnant with Garp after forcing herself onto a braindead soldier. As Garp grows up, he wants to move out of his mother's shadow as the son of a successful feminist. He see's himself as a writer and he even woo's local girl Helen (Mary Beth Hurt), they have two kids together and Garp gets himself into a weird friendship with transexual Roberta Muldoon (John Lithgow). It's a good adaptation of Irving's book, even if it's not quite as daring as it could be, playing it a little too safe. But, it's well made, and Williams turns in a good performance, while nearly everyone else in the film but him creates the comedy, (Lithgow is a standout.) It's a good look at American eccentricity. 3.5/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Fri Oct 30, 2009 1:35 pm

Hud (2nd view) - One of the few Paul Newman films I've seen in which he isn't the best thing on screen. Actually, he's pretty much the worst one here, a turn that was like a bizarre hybrid of Warren Beatty in Bonnie and Clyde and useless features in A Streetcar Named Desire. The film's top notch though and the supporting cast excel - 4/5




Good Bye Lenin! (1st view) - Decent comedy set during the unification of Germany - 3/5*




Bicycle Thieves/Ladri di biciclette (1st view) - A classic Italian neo-realist film that made me think of an odd combination of the market scene from Raiders Of The Lost Ark and The Phantom Raspberry Blower from The Two Ronnies. It's probably wrong that I found most of this hilarious, but the heavy-handed doom and gloom being cranked up throughout just tickled me - 3/5




Let the Right One In/Låt den rätte komma in (1st view) - Atmospheric and chilling vampire film, one of the best in a long time. A shame that the story mainly focuses on the children, as some of the adult characters are equally, if nor more fascinating - 4/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Sat Oct 31, 2009 2:13 am

This Is England (2006), from Shane Meadows, Nottingham's best export, comes this hard-hitting and semi-autobiographical film about the uprising of skinhead thugs in 1980's England. It's a powerful and engaging film, also a touching and truthful coming-of-age film. It's not another British crime gangster film, it's alot more deeper than that. Set in July 1983, and 12 year old Shaun (Thomas Turgoose) has just left school for the summer, he's being picked on because his father was killed in the Falklands. But, he finds an unlikely gang of friends with a group of moddish skinheads, led by Woody (Joseph Gilgun). Shaun's mum Cynthia (Jo Hartley) is initially skeptical of Shaun hanging around with rough looking youths, but she soon accepts them. Shaun even has an innocent with older girl Smell (Rosamund Hanson). But, when former gang member Combo (Stephen Graham) is released from jail, he tries to force his now white nationalist views on the group, which splits it in two, but Shaun finds himself being brainwashed by Combo's racist views. From it's opening montage of channel hopping all things 1980's, it sets it's tone. This is the original broken Britain, a much more savage time of hardships, loving recreated here. The film is well made for a low-budget, newcomer Turgoose is a loveable skinhead kid, while Stephen Graham is terrifying as Combo. There are people like Combo in this horrible world, and it's really authentic. Meadow's best film to date. 4/5



The Thing (1982), John Carpenter came to prominence with Halloween (1978), The Fog (1980) and Escape From New York (1981). Now, he decided to do a big budget version of John W. Campbell, Jr's short story Who Goes There? which was made into The Thing from Another World, in 1951. But, Carpenter planned to stay faithful to Campbell's original story, keeping it's remote setting and making it very gory too. It's very effective as well!! In the winter of 1982, in the depths of Antartica, it's set at an American outpost manned by 12 men, led by the station commander Garry (Donald Moffat). When a Norwegian helicopter from a nearby base starts shooting at them, the team kill two Norwegian scientists, then they decide to investigate why they were doing that. A small team, led by R.J. MacReady (Kurt Russell) and Dr. Copper (Richard Dysart) go to to the Norwegian base, and discover that they found an alien spacecraft stuck in the ice for 100,000 years, and that one alien being got out, and is now amongst them, trying to mimic their shapes. It's a claustrophobic film, close in tone to something like Alien. But, it does have some brilliant gory horror, with brilliant make-up designed by Rob Bottin. Carpenter keeps the mood up throughout the film, and it's a good ensemble too. This is one of the best horror films to have come out of Hollywood in the past 30 years, and it's Carpenter's best film!! Very Happy 5/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Sun Nov 01, 2009 9:49 am

The Young Victoria (1st view) - Seemed a bit skimpy on details but it certainly looked good. Any film with Jim Broadbent and Paull Bettany is good enought for me - 4/5*



_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Tue Nov 03, 2009 9:59 am

The Visitor (1st view) - Wonderful drama with a fantastic central performance from Richard Jenkins. I'm not sure if it's depressingly uplifting or heartwarmingly bleak, but I never knew that watching someone learn to play the bongos could be so charming - 4/5




High Anxiety (1st view) - I don't like Mel Brooks' films all that much, but this was was at least interesting trying to spot all the references to Hitchcock films - 3/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Tue Nov 03, 2009 12:53 pm

Far From The Madding Crowd (1967), after the successes of Billy Liar (1963) and Darling (1965) for which Julie Christie won a Best Actress Oscar, John Schlesinger took on Thomas Hardy's 4th novel from 1874. Schlesigner gave this classic old novel a feel of the British new wave, and it flies in despite it's epic running time. It flies by, and it's filled with a brilliant cast as well, it is a beautiful, sumptuous film too. It's mostly about Bathsheba Everdine (Christie) a beautiful young woman who inherits a farm in the wide Wessex countryside. She has a relationship with 3 different men, including shepherd Gabriel Oak (Alan Bates) who is attracted by her beauty. Then there's rich gentlemen farmer William Boldwood (Peter Finch) who is also trying to woo her, and there's also Hussar Sgt. Francis Troy (Terence Stamp), a handsome swordsman who eventually marries Bathsheba, even if he was set to marry Fanny Robin (Prunella Ransome). Photographed in glourious widescreen by Nicolas Roeg, this is a beautiful and powerful film, with some great performances and some very memorable scenes. The countryside of Dorset and Wiltshire is beautiful. To think Schlesinger followed this up with Midnight Cowboy!! What a transition!! Very Happy 4.5/5



The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), for the 10th James Bond film, it came after a horrendous legal delay, (producer Harry Saltzman left, they couldn't use the plot from Ian Fleming's original book and lawsuits followed), it seemed like it would never be made, but producer Cubby Broccoli was determined to make this one the biggest and the best James Bond film, and ensure that it would be a success. He was right, the success of this film showed that Bond wasn't losing his touch into the 1970's. The film involves submarines seemingly disappearing, James Bond (Roger Moore) is sent to investigate, it takes him to Egypt, where he meets up with Russian agent, Major Anya Amasova (Barbara Bach), who is investigating the same case, it is decided to team them up to find out who is behind it. It takes them to shipping magnate Karl Stromberg (Curt Jurgens), who has sent out henchman Jaws (Richard Kiel) to get them. It is epic in scope, but it is an enjoyable film, helped by Lewis Gilbert's humourous direction and Ken Adam's jaw-dropping sets, (including the supertanker interior). It has some brilliant scenes, including the ski jump to open a Union Jack parachute. That's what you call "Keeping the British end up." No-one does it better than Bond!! Very Happy 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Tue Nov 03, 2009 2:43 pm

The Great Outdoors (1988), from John Hughes, still at this time famous for his films on teen growing pains, made a film closer in tone to the National Lampoon's Vacation films he wrote, although heavily watered down to be suitable for a family audience. It would also herald the tone of films to come from Hughes, with it's slapstick comedy. But, it is very funny, and it has some good genuine laughs. It has Chicago family man Chester "Chet" Ripley (John Candy), his wife Connie (Stephanie Faracy), and their two sons Buck (Chris Young) and Benny (Ian Giatti) going on a week-long holiday to the picturesque lake resort of Pechoggin, Wisconsin. They have high-hopes for their break away, and then Connie's sister Kate (Annette Benning) and her know-it-all accountant husband Roman Craig (Dan Aykroyd) and their two daughters turn up as a surprise, and Roman get's on Chet's nerves alot, and everything seems to go wrong, especially when animals turn up. It's a good timepiece of 1980's family fun, maybe a little sagging in parts, but Aykroyd and Candy make a good pairing, and it's entertaining while it lasts, but it was a warning of things to come from Hughes, like with Home Alone and all... 4/5



The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain (1995), a forgotten little British film set in Wales with a long title made a decade and a bit ago. It's an amusing little film, quite close in tone to the Ealing comedies made back in the 1950's, and that's what it feels like too, but it is entertaining and fun while it lasts, plus for once, it's leading man isn't annoying. Razz Set in 1917, it has two cartographers the pompous Garrad (Ian McNeice) and his assistant Anson (Hugh Grant) who come to the small Welsh village of Ffynnon Garw to measure it's mountain. However, there's a problem, it's not a mountain, it's a hill. As it's a few feet short of being the required 1000 feet to be classified as a mountain. The villagers, led by local innkeeper Morgan the Goat (Colm Meaney) and the Reverend Robert Jones (Kenneth Griffith) come up with a plan to ensure that this hill gets classified as a mountain, making a big mound of earth on the top to do that, even if it means ensuring that the two cartographer's stay around a little longer. It's a very amusing fim with a gentle sense of humour, (similiar to what Waking Ned (1998) would later do.) It's got alot of colourful characters in this little village, as most comedies like this do. Maybe we need something like this again soon, this film deserves a look in. It may sound true, but it's fiction. How wily of it's makers... Razz 3.5/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Wed Nov 04, 2009 11:52 pm

Michael Jackson's This Is It (2009), the title says it all. Before Michael Jackson's untimely death this June at 50. He had been hard at work, rehearsing and preparing for what he said would be his last ever concert performances at the o2 Arena in London. From March until June, he was hard at work, hoping what he had in mind would put him back in the spotlight one last time. This film is a tantalising glimpse of what could have been. Under the direction of Jackson's longtime choreographer and High School Musical director Kenny Ortega. Michael Jackson indeed had something very special in mind for his fans who had hoped to see him this summer. Despite all the reports of his failing health right up to his death, he can still move like he did 25-30 years ago. He shows great energy and tenacity. Jackson and Ortega had even filmed special sequences blending him in with 1940's films as well as doing a 3-D version of Thriller. Jackson is protrayed as a perfectionist, but he wanted the shows to go perfectly. The songs are still performed well, even at the rehearsal stage, and it's a pity his vision never came to light, as it does look stunning. The film stands as the Lost in La Mancha of concert documentary films, a glimpse of the genius that never happened... 3.5/5



Jennifer's Body (2009), after winning a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for Juno (2007), blogger/writer Diablo Cody has created another tale of teen angst in a small town. However, unlike Juno, this one isn't about the trials of teen pregnancy, this one is alot more grisly than that. But well done to Cody for doing something a little different, it's not as nasty as it could have been, but it's funny and it's scary in all the right places. Set in the town of Devil's Kettle, it has best friends Jennifer Check (Megan Fox) and Anita "Needy" Lesnicki (Amanda Seyfried), who have been best friends since they were little, even if Jennifer is the popular girl at school and Needy was always a bit of a geek. Anyways, they go out one night to see indie rock band Low Shoulder at a local bar. But, that night the bar mysteriously burns down, everyone except Jennifer, Needy and the band are burned alive, then Jennifer is taken away by the band, and when she returns, she's a different person all together, and murder's occur in their town. It's a very entertaining film, the horror is gruesome and there is some very good dialogue, (Cody is very good at that), the direction by Karyn Kusama (Aeon Flux) is tight and focused on the action, with amusing little touches. Fox is a sultry demon, but Seyfried is the heart of the film. Probabily the most surprising film of the year, not as bad as what some say. Oh, and J.K. Simmons is in it, he's welcome in ANY film!! Very Happy 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Fri Nov 06, 2009 11:04 am

Der Baader Meinhof Komplex (1st view) - I probably would have liked this more but my watching was hampered by the teeniest, tiniest, "need binoculars to see them and even then you’ll get a headache" subtitles on the planet - 4/5*




Revolutionary Road (1st view) - Some excellent performances and it’s probably my favourite Sam Mendes film other than Road To Perdition. Nice score as well, but you can spot a Thomas Newman piece a mile away - 4/5*




Metropolis (1st view) - Only marginally better than its more famous namesake, not that that’s much of a recommendation - 2/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!


Last edited by Gimli the Dweeb on Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:08 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Donald McKinney
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 24216
Join date : 2008-07-21

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Fri Nov 06, 2009 10:00 pm

Nine to Five (1980), the big comedy hit of 1980, and it's one that even nearly 30 years later, stands the test of time, (even if what they had in offices back then is a little dated, the story is one which can work anywhere and at any time. It's got three brilliant female leads, one slimey, show-stealing male lead from a very underrated actor and an unforgetable theme tune too!! Set within the office space of the Consolidated corporation, it follows 3 workers, new girl Judy Bernly (Jane Fonda), who is taken under the wing of Violet Newstead (Lily Tomlin), also on the floor is Doralee Rhodes (Dolly Parton), who is personal secretary to the company's department executive Franklin Hart, Jr. (Dabney Coleman), who is arrogant and sexist, which annoys them, and after a pot induced party, they decide upon getting even with their boss, even if it means accidental attempted murder and imprisonment. It's a very funny film, which is very entertaining and enjoyable. It's sassy and smart, and it probabily sums up how many people feel about working in an office environment, Dabs steals the film with his scheming performance which is brilliant to watch, the three female leads are equally engaging. 4/5



A Christmas Carol (2009), Robert Zemeckis takes on Charles Dickens with his third motion capture film after The Polar Express (2004) and Beowulf (2007), even after the criticisms those faced, but here, he seems to have cracked it, the characters in the film don't look like zombies anymore, he's fixed the controversial eye problem. But, he does Dickens justice and it looks brilliant in 3-D as well, and he gets brilliant multiple performances from his actors. Set in Victorian London, it has stingy miser Ebeneezer Scrooge (Jim Carrey), who hates Christmas with a passion, and he treats his faithful employee Bob Crachit (Gary Oldman) horribly. Then, one Christmas Eve, he gets a visit from former business partner Jacob Marley (also Oldman) that 3 spirits (all Carrey) will visit him during the night, and show him the error of his ways, and where it all went wrong for him. It's brilliantly made, and this film proves that mo-cap, in the right hands, can be a good idea. You can do stuff with it that looks amazing, and in 3-D, it looks so much better. Carrey is a perfect choice for Scrooge, he plays the part with life and relish. Plus, there's friendly cameos from Colin Firth as Scrooge's nephew Fred and Bob Hoskins as Mr. Fezziwig. An enjoyable film that brings Dickens' morality tale kicking and screaming into the 21st Century. 4/5

Back to top Go down
View user profile
Gimli The Avenger
Admin
Admin


Posts : 26739
Join date : 2008-07-23
Location : Middle Earth

PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:05 am

Out Of The Blue (1st view) - A New Zealand films that recounts the events that took place in the town of Aramoana in 1990, in which 13 people were killed by gunman David Gray. I thought at times it was quite a cold and clinical film, but there are some fine performances and it does manage to portray just how shocking an event this was - 4/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: What I've just watched   

Back to top Go down
 
What I've just watched
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 27 of 30Go to page : Previous  1 ... 15 ... 26, 27, 28, 29, 30  Next
 Similar topics
-
» How many times have you watched Mai HiME?
» Gerard Butler charmingly tells "The Ugly Truth" - LA Times
» Recently Watched
» Recent DVD's watched.
» Which parts of Sailor Moon stuck with you when you first watched it?

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Pages Of Power 4 :: Entertainment :: Film-
Jump to: