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 What I've Just Watched: Part 2

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Silver
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Mon May 24, 2010 7:28 pm

Gimli the Worthless wrote:

Robin Hood (2010) - One of the best film versions of Robin Hood I've seen. Not as good as Scott's previous historical epics, but still a great watch - 4/5*


Just back from this, took a while to get going but I enjoyed it. 4/5
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue May 25, 2010 12:49 am

The Kite Runner (2007), directed by Marc Forster, best known for Monster's Ball (2001), Finding Neverland (2004) and Quantum of Solace (2008) and adapted from the bestselling 2003 novel by Khaled Hosseini is a touching though heavy going drama set behind enemy lines and highlighting the ongoing plight of the people of Afghanistan, but there is a sense of hope throughout the film. It's about Amir (Khalid Abdalla), an Afghan who emigrated to America, back in Afghanistan when he was a boy (Zekeria Ebrahimi) he was friends with servants son Hassan (Ahmad Khan Mahmidzada) is a servants son in the Wazir Akbar Khan district of Kabul, Hassan gets bullied, but Amir is there to protect him. They fly kites together, but in 1979, the Soviets invade and are both seperated. As an adult, Amir hears that Hassan has been killed by the Taliban but he had a son, Sohrab (Ali Danish Bakhtyari), so Amir decides to risk his life and head back to his home country, into war torn Afghanistan to save his best friends son. But he soon discovers more. It's a moving but well made story, with a good cast. The kite flying sequences are beautifully shot represent the hope these people have of better lives. Marc Forster is a brilliantly talented director, and there's better films to come from him methinks!! 4/5



Heaven's Gate (1980), after the Oscar win for The Deer Hunter (1978). Michael Cimino was given a blank cheque by United Artists to make his dream film, a bleak anti-western about the infamous Johnson County War. It was to be the new Gone With The Wind, instead, it was the biggest flop of all time and bankrupted United Artists. But, the fact of the matter is it isn't THAT bad, but it's hard to watch, and it didn't NEED to be that long or cost that much. Set in Johnson County, Wyoming in 1890. It has local sheriff Jim Averill (Kris Kristofferson) caught in the middle of a battle between the Wyoming Stock Growers Association led by Frank Canton (Sam Waterston), who are feuding with European settlers on their land, and are planning as massacre of the settlers, but Averill will have non of it. Meanwhile, he's in a relationship with local bordello madam Ella Watson (Isabelle Huppert), who is having a secret affair with landowners enforcer Nathan Champion (Christopher Walken). It does have some good moments, but not all that much really happens, and Cimino's ego is on show throughout, it was a vanity project for him, and he wasn't thinking of who would want to see it. It has a brilliant cast in it, also including Jeff Bridges, John Hurt, Brad Dourif, Mickey Rourke, Ronnie Hawkins, Terry O'Quinn and Joseph Cotten. But, even the beautiful rollerskating scene or college opening can't save it. Close, but no cigar. Razz 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue May 25, 2010 12:51 am

Keeping Mum (2005), a small British comedy that made little impact when it was released 5 years ago. It tries to be like an old Ealing comedy, but it's darker than that, written by American novelist Richard Russo, it's not as bad as what people say, but it's an old fashioned English farce. Set in the Cornish village of Little Wallop, it has Reverend Walter Goodfellow (Rowan Atkinson) trying to write the perfect sermon for a conference he's going to, but he's failing to notice his wife Gloria (Kristin Scott Thomas) is having an affair with her golf instructor Lance (Patrick Swayze), Walter's daughter Holly (Tamsin Egerton) is going through loads of boyfriends and his son Petey (Toby Parkes) is being bullied at school. The family seems to be falling apart, then there comes the arrival of the new housekeeper, Grace (Maggie Smith) who notices what a disarray the family is in, and is determined to put things right, even if that means murder. But there's more shocks in store when a few secrets come to light. It's a good little film, not perfect but it has it's moments and it has it's laughs. It's a different sort of role for Atkinson, more sensitive and caring, and Maggie Smith is wonderful too. Think of this one as Nanny McPhee meets Serial Mom. Razz 3/5



Four Lions (2010), Chris Morris is back. Yes, the media troublemaker best known for The Day Today, Brass Eye and Jam is at it again, and this time, he's made the move to the big screen, and for his first film, he's done a comedy about suicide bombers. It's not as controversial as it's reputation preceeds, it's actually engaging, sensitive in places and very funny. Set in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. It has a group of wannabe suicide bombers. Omar (Riz Ahmed), Waz (Kayvan Novak), Faisal (Adeel Akhtar), Hassan (Arsher Ali) and Barry (Nigel Lindsay), sick of the Westerners view of Muslims, decide to plot a terrorist attack. Omar and Waz go to terrorist school in Pakistan, which doesn't last long. When they get back, they decide what to bomb, Barry wants to blow up a Mosque, Waz suggests the Internet, but then they all agree on the London Marathon. But, with one another all squabbling, will they stay alive to reach their target?? It's a very small, contained film but it's also powerful and engaging. There's a sense of truth about it all, and that there might be people like our hapless heroes out there somewhere in some normal looking suburb. Morris has touched upon something there, but he's able to find laughs within from the situations the cast find themselves in, and they feel honest too. What will Morris attempt next we wonder?? :Wink: 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue May 25, 2010 12:52 am

Look Back In Anger (1959), the directorial debut of Tony Richardson, who had got his start in the theatre and with the English Stage Company. For his first film, he adapted the controversial 1956 stage play by John Osborne, which Richardson had directed on the stage. It's a very real look at a very real situation many people faced then, it's a good drama, even if the main character in it is a total arsehole. Set in Derby, it has Jimmy Porter (Richard Burton), a market stall owner and aspiring trumpet player who wants to make a better life for him and his wife Alison (Mary Ure). But, all is not happy in paradise, with Jimmy's temper getting the better of him and neighbour Cliff (Gary Raymond), who tries to keep the peace. Alison is pregnant, and can't bring herself to tell Jimmy. After one bust up too many she goes to her parents, and her friend Helena Charles (Clare Bloom) begins an affair with Jimmy, but will that last?? Shot in film-noir style by Oswald Morris, this is a bleak look at what Britain was like in the 1950's, people aspiring better things for themselves but they'd never get it because of their position in working class, especially up north. This put Richardson on the map as a director, and gave Burton one of his best roles. 4/5



Hidden Agenda (1990), Ken Loach had spent much of the 1980's in uncertainty, getting what he could between TV and film, some stuff from that era was banned on TV too. But, he eventually settled on this tense political thriller about the troubles of Northern Ireland, politcal cover-ups and even question the decisions taken by the Royal Ulster Constabulary. The film begins when American civil rights activist and lawyer Paul Sullivan (Brad Dourif) is killed while investigating allegations he heard on a cassette tape. His girlfriend and fellow activist Ingrid Jessner (Frances McDormand) is left to pick up the pieces, meanwhile London sends top police detective Kerrigan (Brian Cox) to Belfast to investigate into the murder, and he discovers cover-ups, a series of lies and dead-ends, until Kerrigan and Jessner meet renegade IRA man Harris (Maurice RoŽves), who lets them in on a few secrets, regarding what was on the tape Sullivan was listening to, which scandalises the UK Government. It's a very tense and uncomfortable film, but it's alot more well polished than many of Loach's other films, though it did win the Special Jury Prize at Cannes in 1990. While it does have a brilliant cast, McDormand and Cox are brilliant as always, it succeeds in making Belfast look like an absolutely appalling place. It might have changed alot in the last 20 years, but it's not the sort of place you'd go for a holiday. This film is enough to put ANYONE off going. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue May 25, 2010 12:52 am

Catch Me If You Can (2002), Steven Spielberg made a break from big blockbuster films with dark overtones like A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) and Minority Report (2002) to make this this light and bubbly comedy-drama, about America's youngest con-man, and it's all true. And it's Spielberg's most pleasurable film in years, enjoyable and refreshing. It's about Frank Abagnale Jr. (Leonardo DiCaprio), who runs away when his parents Frank Sr. (Christopher Walken) and Paula (Nathalie Baye) divorce before he was 20, passed himself off as an airline pilot, a doctor and a lawyer, and making money with fake cheques all across America, and eventually the rest of the world. However, he soon has FBI agent Carl Hanratty (Tom Hanks), on his tail, and it soon becomes a game of cat and mouse between the two. It's good to see Spielberg attempt something as light as this, it's opening credits set the tone perfectly, and he gives DiCaprio probabily the best role of his career, and it captures the era of 1960's America, when everything was colourful, perfectly. Some of it may come across as unbelievable for the purposes of artistic licence, but it's still enjoyable nontheless. 4/5



The Terminal (2004), after Catch Me If You Can (2002), Steven Spielberg was in the mood for something else light in tone, and came upon a script that had originated with Andrew Niccol (writer of The Truman Show). It's an enjoyable little film with a bit of a dark undercurrent which goes to show you can see alot more of the world if you're stuck in one place. Set at JFK International Airport, it begins when Viktor Navorski (Tom Hanks) arriving in New York but is refused entry to the U.S. because of a military revolution in his Eastern European home country of Krakozhia, because of that, he can't go home either. So, he's put into the main terminal. Immigration Officer Frank Dixon (Stanley Tucci) plots stuff to pass the buck onto someone else, and have Navorski removed from the airport. But, he finds a derelict part of the terminal, which he makes his home, he also has a romance with flight attendant Amelia Warren (Catherine Zeta-Jones). It's a charming and amusing little film, with some funny moments within and it's touching too. It's a different sort of role for Hanks, and the set of the airport terminal is jaw-dropping. The cast is wonderful too, including Diego Luna, Chi McBride, ZoŽ Saldana and Kumar Pallana, the latter steals every scene he's in. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue May 25, 2010 12:53 am

Robin Hood (2010), Sir Ridley Scott takes to Sherwood Forest for his latest historical epic, taking on the legend and myth of Robin Hood. Giving him an origin story, how he came to be. It makes for a good action-adventure, with Scott's perfect visual eye doing wonders yet again, it has a brilliant cast and good action too. Set in the 12th Century, it has archer Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) fighting the Crusades in France with King Richard the Lionheart (Danny Huston). When the King is killed in battle. On his way home with Alan A'Dale (Kevin Durand), Will Scarlett (Scott Grimes), and Little John (Alan Doyle). They come across an ambush of the King's guard by the traitorous Sir Godfrey (Mark Strong), but Robin takes the identity of a dead knight, Sir Robert Loxley, and his men retrieve the crown and return it to King John (Oscar Isaac), Richard's younger brother. Robin and his men travel to Nottingham to break the news of Loxley's death to his father Walter (Max Von Sydow) and his widow Lady Marion (Cate Blanchett). Meanwhile, Sir Godfrey is plotting a French invasion of England. It's a very good action film, considering it could have been so much different, but in Ridley Scott's hands, he's made it a fun, enjoyable adventure. Russell Crowe makes a good action hero, never mind the accent, and Blanchett portrays a different kind of Marion, this one is tough as old boots. The rest of the cast, including William Hurt, Eileen Atkins, Matthew Macfadyen and Mark Addy round out the film nicely, and it leaves the door open for more films!! :Wink: 4.5/5



My Super Ex-Girlfriend (2006), from Ivan Reitman, best known for Ghostbusters (1984), Kindergarten Cop (1990) and Dave (1993) comes this twist on the superhero film. It's such a good concept but the finished product comes up short. Where did it all go wrong?? Even in Reitman's hands, a man who was once so good at comedy, something isn't right about this. Set in New York, the film has weedy architect Matt Saunders (Luke Wilson) falling for dumpy art curator Jenny Johnson (Uma Thurman), who just so happens to be a superhero, known as G-Girl, getting her superpowers from a meteor when she was a teenager. However, Jenny shows alot of aggressive behavior in bed and during dates, plus there's nasty jealousy toward's Matt's co-worker Hannah (Anna Faris), causing Matt to dump Jenny, so she vows she'll make his life a living hell because of that, and uses her superpowers to do so. Then, "supervillian" Professor Bedlam (Eddie Izzard) offers to help Matt with his predicament. Everything that should have worked with this falls flat, it feels dated too, like it's from the late 1980's/early 1990's. Plus, it would have worked better if it was darker, like The Cable Guy, it only hints at that, but never goes there. It has some chucklesome moments, but there's something uncomfortable about the tone of this film. 2/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue May 25, 2010 4:01 am

Glad you liked Robin Hood!

_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Wed May 26, 2010 1:48 am

I always knew it would be good!! Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Sat May 29, 2010 9:07 am

Just seen Silver's post about Robin Hood too. Looks like we all liked it!!



Sherlock Holmes (3rd view) - Just as much as fun as at the cinema. One of the best films of the last year - 4/5




Babylon A.D. (1st view) - There's an interesting story at the heart of this film, but shoddy dialogue, poor effects and lacklustre performances mean that it's lost in the mess - 2/5*




The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (1st view) - Completely and utterly bonkers, but done in the way only Gilliam can. One that I'm sure will get even better with rewathes - 4/5*




Waitress (1st view) - Enjoyable romantic comedy/drama, nice performances. As far as food-related films of recent years go, it's better than Julie and Julia and No Reservations. Not a patch on Ratatouille though! - 3/5*




Collateral (3rd view) - f Jamie Foxx had to win an Oscar at the 2004 awards, I'd have preferred it to be for this rather than Ray. He's much better in this, outdoing Cruise the whole way through. Great thriller - 4/5




10 Items Or Less (1st view) - Morgan Freeman stars as an actor researching for his first role in four years, for which he'll play a supermaket manager. He strikes up a conversation with checkout assistant Pav Vega, and he then helps her spend the day readying for a job interview. It's a slight film, feels like a 30 minute short stretched out to just over an hour, but highly likeable - 4/5*




Synecdoche, New York (1st view) - With the exception of Philip Seymour Hoffman's performance, this was a great, big, steaming heap of bs, and Hoffman can do sad-sack losers in his sleep. It'll be interesting to see if, one day, Charlie Kaufman will write something vaguely normal, as he seems to have lost his knack for the kooky stuff - 2/5*




The Walker (1st view) - Woody Harrelson stars as Carter Page III, a walker who escorts women to social events, but ends up a suspect in a murder case. Harrelson is excellent but the film's far too predictable - 3/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Sun May 30, 2010 1:03 pm

Where The Wild Things Are (2009), Spike Jonze is back, 7 years after his second film, Adaptation (2002). But this time, he's taken the biggest gamble of his career. Taking on the allegedly unfilmable book by Maurice Sendak. It took him 5 years to get it up on the screen, (almost 3 in post-production), but he succeeded. What could have been just another children's fantasy film has transpired into something much more than that, it's a lovesong to the brilliance of being young. It follows Max (Max Records), a hyperactive boy who gets himself into trouble with his mother (Catherine Keener), and runs away from home. He discovers a boat which takes him out to an island where his discovers the titular Wild Things, who include Carol (James Gandolfini), KW (Lauren Ambrose), Ira (Forest Whittaker), Judith (Catherine O'Hara), Alexander (Paul Dano) and Douglas (Chris Cooper). Max claims to be a king, and proclaims "Let the wild rumpus start!!" It's a beautiful film, with a lot of heart and imagination on display. It's a film about the passing of childhood, and how some grow out of it quicker than others, but if anything, this film encourages childhood to go on for a bit longer. For anyone who used to play around in the dirt or cause trouble, then this film is for you, it may bring back memories, and you may even shed a tear. The cast, both human and Wild Things, are brilliant, and it's one of the best films of 2009, just for being different in look and tone. Welcome back Spike, don't be a stanger now, y'hear?? 5/5



Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009), Wes Anderson takes on Roald Dahl, and he does it with a primitive looking stop-motion animation, a step back from what you've seen with Aardman or even anything Tim Burton has worked on. The result is a likeable and unusual film, although you can see alot of Dahl's influence here, it's unmistakenly a Wes Anderson film through and through, and that's a good thing!! Very Happy Set in an old-fashioned looking England, it has Mr. Fox (George Clooney) moving into a tree on a hill with his family, Mrs. Fox (Meryl Streep), son Ash (Jason Schwartzman) and their nephew Kristofferson (Eric Chase Anderson). But, he goes off on one last raid with opossum Kylie (Wally Wolodarsky) to raid the stock of farmers Boggis, Bunce and Bean. But, when they ambush him and try to dig him out. They team up with other animals to try and get their own back on the farmers. It's a very unusual looking film, many will be put off by the animals with American accents. But, don't let that put you off, it's still a very enjoyable film, full of the usual quirks and humour that we've come to expect from Wes Anderson. The supporting vocal cast, including Bill Murray, Willem Dafoe, Owen Wilson and Michael Gambon are very enjoyable, and the soundtrack is the icing on a different kind of cake indeed!! Very Happy 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:08 am

3.10 To Yuma (3rd view) - Almost on a par with the original. Awesome score too - 4/5*




Codebreakers (1st view) - Tv movie about a cheating scandal at West Point Academy during the Korean War. Instantly forgettable - 2/5*




The Enigma Of Kaspar Hauser (1st view) - The only Werner Herzog films I've seen before that I liked have been his documentaries, so I was surprised how much I liked this. The story of Hauser always used to freak me out when I was little - 4/5*




Fame (1st view) - Very enjoyable, but I can't get over ER's Dr Romano having curly, red hair! - 4/5*




The Man Who Wasn't There (1st view) - Especially good when Tony Shalhoub was on screen. especially bad when Scarlett Johansson was on screen - 4/5*




4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (1st view) - Excellent. One of the very best films I've seen this year. Probably need to be in the right mood for it though as it can be quite depressing at times - 4/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Wed Jun 02, 2010 11:49 pm

Up! (1976), not to be confused with the title of the recent Disney/Pixar animation, this one is by Russ Meyer, the sexploitation master best known for underground sex comedies such as Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (1965) and Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls (1970). Here, he creates a murder mystery whodunnit, but in his own unique inimitable way. It begins with the murder of one Adolf Schwartz (Edward Schaaf), murdered in his bathtub in his huge Bavarian castle in California, but none of the locals really seem to care whodunnit, as they've all been distracted by the busty Margo Winchester (Raven De La Croix), who has hitchhiked into town and all the men are lusting after her including local cop Homer Johnson (Monty Bane). However, more murders occur, leading Winchester to take action, the action is explained to us by nude girl Greek Chorus (Kitten Natividad). It's a convulated plot, but as it's Russ Meyer, you don't seem to mind, it is as crazy as they come. The sex and nudity is quite hilarious, no-one films sex quite like Russ Meyer used to. You don't seem to mind any of the short comings this film has, as you're distracted by other stuff going on, Meyer was good with cinematography and getting all the right angles!! Razz 4/5



Vanishing Point (1971), probabily the definitive action road movie of it's time, a movie of the 1970's, which inspired alot of car chase movies in it's wake. It's quite minialist, with not much of a plot to it's name, but what Easy Rider did for biker films, this does for car chase films!! The scenary it was shot in looks stunning!! The film focuses on a car-delivery driver who goes by the name of Kowalski (Barry Newman), who works for Argo's Car Delivery Service in Denver, Colorado, and he's assigned to deliver a white 1970 Dodge Challenger to San Francisco. Kowalski is an adrenaline junkie, after a few failed careers, he gets the ultimate kick with this one, he sets off from Denver at 11:30pm on a Friday, and he believes he can have the car delivered to San Francisco in 15 hours. He sets off at top speed, and then he has the police trying to stop him, but he's determined to go on. He has spiritual help from blind radio DJ Super Soul (Cleavon Little). It's a very atmospheric film. Not much plot, but with good music and good car action to it's name, it's never boring, with the odd splashes of sex, nudity and violence thrown in for good measure. Look out for cameos from Rita Coolidge and Charlotte Rampling!! 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Wed Jun 02, 2010 11:50 pm

Ocean's Eleven (2001), after Steven Soderbergh and George Clooney had the success of working together on Out Of Sight (1998), and Soderbergh winning an Oscar for Traffic (2000), they'd become very successful indeed, with Hollywood at their command, and they settled upon a remake of the 1960 Rat Pack film Ocean's 11. It's remake would turn out to be slick, tight, funny, fast and very entertaining with an amazing cast. It has crook Danny Ocean (Clooney) breaking parole and reteaming with partner in crime Rusty Ryan (Brad Pitt), Ocean wants to get back at his old rival Terry Benedict (Andy Garcia), whose girlfriend is Ocean's ex-wife Tess (Julia Roberts). He wants to rob the 3 casino's Benedict own in Las Vegas. So, Ocean and Ryan assemble the team, which consist of Reuben Tishkoff (Elliott Gould), Frank Catton (Bernie Mac), Virgil Malloy (Casey Affleck), Turk Malloy (Scott Caan), Livingston Dell (Eddie Jemison), Basher Tarr (Don Cheadle), The Amazing Yen (Shaobo Qin), Saul Bloom (Carl Reiner) and Linus Caldwell (Matt Damon) to take down Benedict and his casinos. It's very entertaining, with some good moments in it. Soderbergh is a brilliant visual filmmaker, he also shoots it, and has a good visual eye. Clooney and Pitt come off like a Newman and Redford for our era in this, and the rest of the ensemble are very good. 4.5/5



Ocean's Twelve (2004), after Ocean's Eleven (2001) was a huge box office success around the world, it seemed a sequel would be inevitable, and Soderbergh and Co. wasted no time at all getting the gang back together for another round. But, it feels different to the first film, it's a slow burning film, and something isn't quite right about this one, although it does have it's moments. But, as is the case with many trilogies, it stands out as the difficult second film. This time, Terry Benedict (Andy Garcia) wants the money the gang stole in the first film back and he wants it now, all $160 million and $38 million in interest. The gang have spent most of it, so Danny Ocean (George Clooney) and Rusty Ryan (Brad Pitt) decide to head to Europe. An attempt to rob artwork in Amsterdam goes awry when they have the Night Fox AKA Francois Toulour (Vincent Cassel), beat them at their game. So, they head to Rome to steal the Coronation Egg, but the gang now have Europol detective Isabel Lahiri (Catherine Zeta-Jones) on their tails. Soderbergh's love for French New Wave and all other forms of European cinema are evident throughout this whole film. But the film feels forced, and the whole double twist at the end is too much to get around. It is well made through, but there's something just not right about, and seeing Julia Roberts play Tess Ocean playing Julia Roberts is just silly. Razz 3/5



Ocean's Thirteen (2007), Thirteen proves to be a very lucky number indeed for George Clooney and director Steven Soderbergh, after the smug Euro-pudding of Ocean's Twelve (2004), it's safe to say that all is forgiven, they're back to the slick style of Ocean's Eleven (2001), it's back on familiar ground, with the gang doing what they do best. It has the gang back, including Danny Ocean (George Clooney), Rusty Ryan (Brad Pitt), Linus Caldwell (Matt Damon), Saul Bloom (Carl Reiner), Frank Catton (Bernie Mac) and Basher Tarr (Don Cheadle) as they attempt to take down hotel mogul Willie Bank (Al Pacino) as he opens his new casino in Las Vegas, as Bank swindled Reuben Tishkoff (Elliot Gould), out of co-owning the new casino. Ocean and Co. are not gonna stand back and let that happen, so they devise a complex plan to bring down Bank and his Casino. But they also need the help of adversary Terry Benedict (Andy Garcia) to help them "break the Bank", it won't be easy, but they're all doing it for Reuben, as they're like family to him. It has some very amusing moments in it, Al Pacino makes a good baddie in it, simmering quietly as Ocean robs his casino. There's no Julia Roberts in this, but there's Ellen Barkin, Eddie Izzard and best of all David Paymer, and EVERYONE likes him!! Very Happy 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:54 pm

Bunny and the Bull (2009), the feature debut of Paul King, who directed the cult TV series The Mighty Boosh. Here, he weaves a surreal and charming little film that's not a million miles away from the stuff Michel Gondry came up with for The Science of Sleep (2006). It's very entertaining, with some good moments throughout with a few familiar faces in there too. It has young shut-in Stephen Turnbull (Edward Hogg), who hasn't left his house in a year, but within his mind, he recreates a road-trip he went on with his best friend Bunny (Simon Farnaby), Bunny had won £2,500 on the horses, so they go around Europe, meeting all kinds of weird people along the way, including a boring museum curator (Richard Ayoade), Russian tramp Allita (Julian Barratt), alcoholic ex-matador Javier (Noel Fielding) and superstitious waitress Eloisa (Veronica Echegui) who has a relationship with Stephen and Bunny. It's fun to see films like this come along, as they're different from all the rest. This one might be a little too much to take in one sitting, but it's still entertaining nontheless. The two leads are likeable, and it's good to see Barratt and Fielding of The Mighty Boosh make amusing appearances. 4/5



Kinky Boots (2005), based upon a true story that was seen on the BBC documentary series Trouble at the Top. This is a charming and touching British comedy-drama which shows an unconventional way to save a dying family business. It's well made with a good cast. It has Charlie Price (Joel Edgerton), son of Northampton shoe magnate Harold Price (Robert Pugh) going to London with fiance Nicola (Jemima Rooper). But then, his father dies, and he finds himself back in Northampton, trying to keep the family business up and running. He tries to sell the backlog of shoes his father had failed to see, but he ends up meeting drag queen performer Lola (Chiwetel Ejiofor), who is a very good performer on stage. Charlie has an idea, one very big idea in which he has to put the company at stake, he wants them to stop making men's shoes which they've been doing for over a century, and to make shoes for male transvestites, with Lola designing them, and all in time for the upcoming Milan Fashion week. It's a good little British film, well directed by Julian Jarrold (Becoming Jane, Brideshead Revisited), and the cast including Edgerton, Ejiofor and Nick Frost, are compelling and add heart to this film. 3.5/5



Great Balls Of Fire (1989), the life of one of the wildest Rock and Roll stars of the 1950's, Jerry Lee Lewis. Based on the book by his ex-wife Myra Gale Brown, whose marriage to Lewis would be his ultimate downfall as his star was on the rise. It's a by the numbers biopic, with all the same chiches. But, it's lead performance is engaging. It follows Jerry Lee Lewis (Dennis Quaid) from 1956 to 1958, as his star was on the rise, he'd signed up with Sun Records, owned by Sam Phillips (Trey Wilson). He records hit records such as Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin On, and Great Balls of Fire. But, he falls for his cousin Myra Gale (Winona Ryder) who is only 13, and secretly marries her in Mississippi. His career continues to be successful, but when he goes over to England for a tour, the details of his marriage get out, and the British public condemn him as a child molester, and it follows him back home to America where he becomes more unhinged with alcohol and becomes abusive. It's a good story to make into a film, but it hardly shows Lewis in a good light, despite all the good intentions. It has a good cast though, look out for Alec Baldwin as Lewis' other cousin, preacher Jimmy Swaggart and Peter Cook as the British Reporter who uncovers the illegal marriage. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Sat Jun 05, 2010 6:31 am

Love Me or Leave Me (1st view) - Biopic of singer/actress Ruth Etting with Doris Day taking the lead, and an awesome James Cagney playing her gangster husband - 4/5*




Kagemusha (1st view) - Only the second Akira Kurosawa film I've seen, and this was much better than Seven Samurai - 4/5*




Do Not Disturb (1st view) - Affable romantic comedy with Doris Day, always lovely, and Rod Taylor, who exhibits his usual tendency to emulate a plank of wood - 4/5*


Before The Devil Knows You're Dead (1st view) - Excellent crime drama from Sidney Lumet, with fantastic performances from Ethan Hawke, Philip Seymour Hoffman and, especially, Albert Finney - 4/5*


_________________
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Behold! We are the Nine,
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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Sun Jun 06, 2010 8:36 am

The Damned United (1st view) - God, I hate football. Watching this just made me depressed, reminding of the fact that there's a solid month of it coming. Sheen and Spall were both very good - 3/5*




Orphan (1st view) - Went well until the end - 3/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:42 pm

Bad Lieutenant (1992), from Abel Ferrara, best known for seedy and gritty films such as The Driller Killer (1979), Ms. 45 (1981) and King of New York (1990) comes this dark and unforgiving look at one man's decent into hell and his one shot at redemption from it all. It's got a good lead performance, but it's darkness does overshadow it. Harvey Keitel plays the titular Lieutenant, who works with the New York Police, investigating homicides. But, he's got a secret life away from his family, he's racked up massive debts betting on baseball, and keeps doubling his bets to try and win money back. Plus he's a druggie, and he takes advantage of teenage girls and is having stands with prostitutes. However, when investigating the rape of a nun (Frankie Thorn), he discovers he has one change at a clean break, he's decended so much into his own personal hellhole, and wants out. The film is one big disequilibrium, there is no hope in this dark tale, Keitel is a moody old bugger and he puts it to good use here. The scary thing is that there is people like this out there. However, it'll be interesting to see what Werner Herzog and Nicolas Cage have done with their "remake". 3/5



Capitalism: A Love Story (2009), Michael Moore rides again. Yes, America's great crusader, who took on gun culture with Bowling for Columbine (2002), Bush in Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004) and the health system in Sicko (2007), is at it again. Now turns his attention to Capitalist America and the Credit Crunch. You can't believe corporate America can do most of the things depicted in the film to their own people. It's just not right. The film focuses on how capitalism and corporate America affects the lives of it's people every day. America has had a great love affair with capitalism, but America has paid a huge price to live the high life. And not very well off families have paid the price the hardest because of these greedy bastards. They gamble people's savings, jobs and homes, and how it nearly ended in near ruin, with over 14,000 jobs being lost every day in America. It is biased against the government and the corporations targeted. It seems to blame Reagan for the culture America is in today, while portraying Barack Obama as a Socialist. Although it's exposed alot of home truths, the sad fact is that it's unlikely things are going to change for the better anytime soon. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:43 pm

Invictus (2009), Clint Eastwood headed to South Africa for this pet project it's star had wanted to do. After an adaptation of Long Walk to Freedom proved impossible, they settled upon an adaptation of John Carlin's 2007 book Playing the Enemy, which focused on a key moment in Nelson Mandela's career, which brought a broken country together. It is a good film, although alot of it feels by the numbers, but it has good performances and has heart. It has Nelson Mandela (Morgan Freeman) becoming President of South Africa in 1994, which has just come out of Apartheid. The Whites are still struggling to come to terms with the new found peace, but Mandela wants to bring them together. Learning the country is hosting the Rugby World Cup in a years time, but the countries national team, the Springboks are not up to scratch, Mandela puts in a call to the teams captain, FranÁois Pienaar (Matt Damon) and encourages him to inspire and lead the team to victory, but it won't be easy. It's a very well made but gentle going story. The rugby scenes are very well recreated. Freeman is of course perfect as Mandela, but Damon adds heart as team leader Pienaar, who became a national treasure in South Africa. Eastwood's direction is tight and unpretentious, but it's an odd choice for him to make. 4/5



Supervixens (1975), Russ Meyer was king of the sexploitation films in the 1960's and 1970's, this man was really on a roll. He certainly wasn't the dirty old man people made him out to be, but he was a charismatic man whose films were always entertaining, offbeat and titilationg. This is one of his most recognisable films, with a mad plot but always watchable. It has gas station attendant Clint Ramsey (Charles Pitts) who is always irresistible to women. It begins when SuperLorna (Christy Hartburg) comes onto him, his wife SuperAngel (Shari Eubank) is jealous as a result, and is murdered by impotent cop Harry Sledge (Charles Napier), Clint is a main suspect, he goes on the run, getting into sexual shenanigans with SuperCherry (Colleen Brennan), SuperSoul (Uschi Digard), SuperEula (Deborah McGuire) and finally SuperVixen (Shari Eubanks again), but then Harry Sledge turns up again, plotting to finish off Clint after he'd ran away. It's a light and breezy sex comedy with dark edges. But, this is the kind of film that never gets made anymore, we tried at sex comedies in the 1970's, but we never reached the giddy heights that Russ Meyer did. He stopped making films too soon, he had more to offer. 5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue Jun 08, 2010 5:44 pm

Absolute Power (1997), Clint Eastwood's 19th film as director, here he adapted David Baldacci's 1996 novel for the screen, and he also starred in it, and it was adapted for the screen by William Goldman. It makes for a taut, tight little thriller with a good cast and well directed by Eastwood, it's actually an underrated film in a way. It has Eastwood as jewel thief Luther Whitney, who witnesses something while robbing the house of Walter Sullivan (E.G. Marshall). He sees U.S. President Alan Richmond (Gene Hackman), having an affair with Sullivan's wife Christy (Melora Hardin), which gets violent and Christy getting killed by the President's Secret Service. Whitney escapes with a letter opener that incriminates President Richmond. Meanwhile, Detective Seth Frank (Ed Harris) investigates the case, and when Whitney is made a suspect, he doesn't believe Whitney was involved, but he turns to Whitney's estranged daughter Kate (Laura Linney) for help, at the same time Whitney is trying to reconsile with Kate. It's got some good moments, but it's very by the numbers, even if it is well directed. Eastwood turns in another good performances, but Hackman feels just a little bit wasted. It's a good idea for a film though. 3.5/5



Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010), adapted from the popular video game by Ubisoft Montreal and Jordan Mechner, directed by Mike Newell and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. Films adapted from video games get a bad press, but this one is one of the better ones, although it is very, very cheesy, like action films like this should be. Although it's ending does let it down a bit. Set within the Persian Empire of the Sixth Century, it has street orphan Dastan (Jake Gyllenhaal) adopted as a son by King Sharaman (Ronald Pickup). After leading the army to the city of Alamut, told by Sharaman's brother Nizam (Ben Kingsley), that they are trading weapons. They attack the city and Dastan comes into possession of a dagger held by Princess Tamina (Gemma Arterton). This is a dagger that can turn back time, and change the course of the future, but when Dastan is framed for the murder of his adoptive father, he goes out of his way to prove he is innocent and return the dagger to the city before it falls into the wrong hands. It is very silly, and alot of the characters throughout this film sound like something from a Cockney gangster film, with Alfred Molina's Sheik Amar looking like he came from Monty Python's Life of Brian. It is well made, with beautiful cinematography by John Seale. I dunno if we'll be seeing a sequel anytime soon, this one has got all mixed up with it's own paradoxes, but the action is well staged though. It's better than the POTC sequels at least. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Wed Jun 09, 2010 8:11 am

Obsessed (1st view) - Similar to every other psycho stalker film I've ever seen and with few new twists to make it seems fresh. Works well though until the overblown finale - 3/5*





The Losers (1st view) - Great fun! Good banter between the crew and some fine action scenes. The fact that I have a thing for two of the cast helped a bit!


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Thu Jun 10, 2010 12:28 am

Whisper of the Heart (1995), from Studio Ghibli, comes this adaptation of Aoi Hiiragi's critically acclaimed manga comic, directed by Yoshifumi Kondō (who sadly died 3 years after this), and written and produced by Hayao Miyazaki. It's a touching and warm romance film, though it keeps it's moments of fantasy to a minimum, when they come, they are well done, and the animation is exquisite. Set in Tokyo suburb of Tama New Town, it has high school girl Shizuku Tsukishima discovering the books she's taken out of her library have been taken out by someone called Seiji Amasawa, she is curious to know who he is. One day, she finds a cat on a train, and follows it to an antiques shop, where it's owner Shiro Nishi has a statue of a cat called Baron Humbert von Jikkingen, which he's had since a visit to Germany years earlier, then Shizuku meets the grandson of Shiro, who just happens to be Seiji Amasawa. It's a well made animation, with some of the best animated sequences that Studio Ghibli has ever done, it has a song all the way through that connects it, Take Me Home, Country Roads by John Denver, which feels quite apt in a way, it was followed up by a sequel, The Cat Returns (2002), which would follow Baron Humbert von Jikkingen. But, Whisper of the Heart is warm and touching and shows Japanese culture in a good light. 3.5/5



Black Christmas (1974), directed by Bob Clark, the director behind such films as Murder by Decree (1979), Porky's (1981), A Christmas Story (1983) and erm... Baby Geniuses (1999). This Canadian horror film became a big cult hit back in the 1970's which spawned a sequel, but this is how it all started, based on true life murders that took place in Montreal. Set in a fraternity house, just before Christmas, it has someone entering it through the attic, and then murders occur. It begins when Clare Harrison (Lynne Griffin) is asphyxiated with a plastic shower curtain. The next day, when Clare's parents come to take her home for the holidays, she's nowhere to be seen and worry for her. Meanwhile, student Jess Bradford (Olivia Hussey) is getting obscene phone calls, so she gets the police in to help, meanwhile she's going through a rocky relationship with her boyfriend, aspiring pianist Peter Smythe (Keir Dullea), but when she tells Peter she's pregnant, he doesn't take the news well at all, and the seeds of doubt are sown, and the body count rises. It's done on the cheap, as most Canadian films back then were, but it's quite effective. You can tell it's from Canada by the accents, but the horror isn't gory, but it's still effective although it does feel dated. Look out for future Lois Lane Margot Kidder in an early role. Razz 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Thu Jun 10, 2010 3:31 am

Whisper Of The Heart is one of only two good Ghibli films I've seen.

_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Sun Jun 13, 2010 12:27 pm

Where the Wild Things Are (1st view) - The creatures are brilliant, the rest is just ok - 3/5*




Defiance (1st view) - Preachy at times and tries top hard to be worthy due to the subject matter but still worthwhile - 4/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Mon Jun 14, 2010 11:53 am

The Blues Brothers (1980), Taken from a Saturday Night Live sketch, this became a huge cult hit upon release, an excessive, musical car chase caper musical with brilliant songs and one HELL of a brilliant supporting cast, from the acting world and music world. It helped put it's director on top for a brief time, and stars out of it's leads, and is a powerful ode to the power and brilliance of blues music. Set in Chicago, it follows Jake (John Belushi) and Elwood Blues (Dan Aykroyd), who are on a mission from God. They have a few days to raise $5,000 to save the orphanage where they grew up in, so they decide to get their band back together, which is easier said than done. But the police, an angry country and western band and the Chicago chapter of Nazi's are after them. It's a wild musical comedy with good laughs, brilliant music and jaw-dropping car chases. John Landis keeps a good pace up throughout. And it's cast includes Cab Calloway, Aretha Franklyn, Carrie Fisher, James Brown, Twiggy, Henry Gibson, John Lee Hooker, John Candy, Frank Oz, Paul Reubens, Charles Napier and Ray Charles!! Never a dull moment and impossible to forget!! Very Happy 5/5



Blues Brothers 2000 (1998), 18 years after the original, and despite the death of John Belushi since then, Dan Aykroyd and John Landis decided the time was right to do another Blues Brothers film, and there was demand from fans for another film. So, they did it. It's certainly not as good as the first film, but it's a sort of guilty pleasure, and it's worth it for the musicians and music, and there is some good comedy throughout. It has Elwood Blues (Aykroyd) being released from jail, and learning Jake has passed on. But, he learns he has a half-brother with Cabel "Cab" Chamberlain (Joe Morton), who just happens to be commander of the Illinois State Police, Elwood wants to get the band back together, he's also got bartender Mighty Mack (John Goodman) and 10-year old orphan named Buster (J. Evan Bonifant) also in the band, and with the band back together, they get a gig at a Battle of the Bands contest at the home of voodoo practitioner Queen Moussette (Erykah Badu). It has it's moments with a lot of cartoonish police car action and slapstick comedy, alot of it doesn't gel, but the Battle of the Bands at the end with Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, B.B. King, Isaac Hayes, Dr. John, Lou Rawls, Jimmie Vaughan and Bo Diddley is well worth sitting through the film for. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 2   Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:00 pm

Somers Town (2008), after the release of This Is England (2006), director Shane Meadows and writer Paul Fraser were asked to do a short film for Eurostar, (yes the train company). The short film ballooned into a feature length film, shot in black and white, it paints a realistic but light-hearted look at life in the centre of London. It has Nottingham teenager Tomo (Thomas Turgoose) who has run away to London, but he has no money and nowhere to stay, but he runs into Polish teenager Marek (Piotr Jagiello), whose father Mariusz (Ireneusz Czop) is working on the construction of the new Eurostar terminal at St Pancras Station, they live in the Somers Town district south of Camden Town. Tomo and Marek strike up a friendship, and hang around together. Marek even lets Tomo sleep in his bedroom, as Tomo has nowhere to sleep. Marek has a hobby with photography, and mainly photographs French waitress Maria (Elisa Lasowski), who Marek is in love with, but cannot tell her, but with Tomo's help, she falls for both boys. It's a very sweet film, it has a roughness around it's edges, but doesn't fall into the trap of being overly grim and gloomy, here there is hope, and it shows it's surroundings in a good light. It's a good contrast to the bleakness of This Is England. 4/5



A Room For Romeo Brass (1999), after Shane Meadows made his critically acclaimed debut film Twenty Four Seven (1997), he made a follow-up film, again set in his hometown of Nottingham. It's a good little comedy-drama with dark bones about it's body, but it was the film debut of Meadows regular Paddy Considine, who has since gone on to greater things. It follows two 13 year old boys Romeo (Andrew Shim) and Gavin (Ben Marshall), who are best friends whose friendship gets them away from the pain of homelife, Gavin has spinal problems, and is due to go into hospital to have it seen to. One day, they befriend local misfit Morell (Considine), who is in his early twenties, but has the mentality of a little boy. However, after Gavin plays a joke on Morell to make him look a fool in front of Romeo's sister Ladine (Vicky McClure), who Morell fancies. In retaliation, Morell drives a wedge between the two boys, physically threatening Gavin and trying to become a father figure to Romeo, whose own father Joe (Frank Harper) abandoned him. It's a touching look at young life in England, Considine gives a powerful, tragic performance, and this put him in good stead for future films. The two young lads are very good, and look out for Bob Hoskins making a cameo. It's an underrated little film. 3.5/5

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