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 What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock

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Donald McKinney
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:38 pm

The Night Listener (2006), based upon the 2000 bestseller by Armistead Maupin (who wrote Tales of the City), this is a true-life psychological thriller which happened to Maupin in 1992 and it kicked off a real life mystery which is still open to this day. It has a good cast, with it's lead playing well against type, and doing well with this complex and short mystery. Gabriel Noone (Robin Williams) is a gay radio talk-show host who has fallen into a slump after his partner Jess (Bobby Cannavale). Gabriel is given the manuscript of a memoir written by teenager Pete Logand (Rory Culkin), which chronicles the sexual abuse he's suffered over the years, which has left him with AIDS. Pete now lives in Wisconsin with social worker Donna (Toni Collette). Peter and Gabriel begin a phone correspondence, but one day it stops, and Jess believes Pete and Donna's voices are almost identical. Gabriel is concerned for Pete's well-being, and flies out to Wisconsin to see if he's OK. When he finds the address doesn't exist, that Pete is reportedly in hospital and that Donna is blind. Nothing is what it seems, and the hospital is 50 miles away, and the locals believe Pete exists, even if they've never seen him. It's a good thriller that doesn't waste time, but even if the story is unbelievable, it's all true. Williams is a great actor, and he should be making more serious films, and Collette makes a good femme fatale. No-one has ever got to the bottom of what really happened, and maybe we never will. 3.5/5



Savages (2012), directed by Oliver Stone, and adapted from Don Winslow's 2010 book, this is a fast and furious crime thriller done with the same visual style Stone used on Natural Born Killers (1994) and U Turn (1997). It might be all over the place, with moments of insanity and operatics here and there, but it's a return to dark form for Stone, but it could have been more exposing. Set in Laguna Beach in California, best friends Chon (Taylor Kitsch) and Ben (Aaron Johnson) grow marijuana, which is used for medical purposes and it's legal. Corrupt DEA agent Dennis (John Travolta) ensures they don't get arrested, plus Chon and Ben share the same girlfriend, O (Blake Lively). When Ben and Chon are offered a deal with a Mexican cartel ran by Elena (Salma Hayek) and represented in America by enforcer Lado (Benicio del Toro), Ben and Chon refuse. However, Elena doesn't take no for an answer, and as revenge for their ignorance, they kidnap O, keeping her in a cage. Ben and Chon plan to get their own back, and bring the cartel down and get their girlfriend back, they intend to get Elena's attention by taking something close to her. It's absolutely insane, and it's a side we haven't seen to Stone in a while. It has a good cast with Kitsch and Johnson making a good buddy-buddy partnership, while Hayek is a a force of nature as the drug lord. It is a bit on the long side, and if Stone does one of his directors cuts for this, it could do with a trim to pick the pacing up, but it's still good though. 3.5/5



Mississippi Burning (1988), directed by Alan Parker, who had been to America's Deep South with Angel Heart (1987) stuck around for this true life crime drama based on a true murder case that happened. It's a gripping and heavy going expose on one of the darkest hours of America's recent history, and one which should never happen again. It's got a brilliant cast and Parker captures the era well. In Jessup County, Mississippi in 1964, three civil rights workers are murdered by a group of bigots, they were detained by the police then released before they were pounced upon. The FBI send two agents to investigate the crime, Agent Rupert Anderson (Gene Hackman) and Agent Alan Ward (Willem Dafoe). Anderson was a sheriff in Mississippi years earlier, and knows too well of the prejudices people have, while Ward is a liberal and is very direct. They first interview Deputy Clinton Pell (Brad Dourif), who both agents believe had a hand in the murders. But when the local Ku Klux Klan threaten the agents, they call for back-up of 100 agents. Meanwhile, Anderson gets information from Pell's wife (Frances McDormand), who has been told to keep quiet about what really happened. It's a powerful and shocking crime mystery, you can't believe people were like this towards blacks and indeed other races in that part of America, and there's still a small minority who hold on to such beliefs. Parker gets the best from his cast, and his crew (all from England) bring Mississippi of the 1960's back to vivid life. 4.5/5



Confetti (2006), directed by Debbie Isitt (Nasty Neighbours (2000) and Nativity (2009)), this is a fun mockumentary which feels like a spiritual British cousin of Drop Dead Gorgeous (1999), with a cast of British comedy performers and actors all sparking off one another, all the dialogue was improvised with Isitt providing the outline, and it works well too. Renowned bridal magazine Confetti, owned by Antoni Clarke (Jimmy Carr) and ran by uptight editor Vivienne (Felicity Montagu), are holding a competition to see who can come up with the most original wedding, and the winner will win a house and be on the cover of the magazine. It's whittled down to 3 couples. Sam and Matt (Jessica Stevenson and Martin Freeman), who want their musical to be in the style of a Busby Berkeley musical from the 1930's, then there's tennis pro's Isabelle and Josef (Meredith MacNeill and Stephen Mangan), who want a tennis themed wedding, and then there's naturists Joanna and Michael (Olivia Colman and Robert Webb), who want to do a nude wedding. The weddings are planned by Gregory and Archie (Vincent Franklin and Jason Watkins), but the couples keep changing their minds and things go awry. It's a very funny film, with some good performances and the finale with the weddings has to be seen to be believed, but it's very original and there's a few recognisable faces from British TV, plus you get Robert Webb's willy on screen too. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:39 pm

Road House (1989), directed by Rowdy Herrington (Striking Distance (1993) and Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius (2004)), this is a great action film from the tail-end of the 1980's, and it's star is on fine form with some brilliant support to back him up. It might not have aged well, and it's a lot cheesier looking back on it, but it's a film from the 80's and proud of it, and it's still great fun to watch. James Dalton (Patrick Swayze) is a "cooler" working in New York City, after seeing him deal with some riff-raff, he is offered a job by Frank Tilghman (Kevin Tighe), who runs the Double Deuce in Jasper, Missouri. Tilghman is planning to revamp the bar, and needed a good cooler to keep the peace. Dalton agrees, and goes down, it's a rough place too, with fights happening frequently, and Dalton finds that local business magnate Brad Wesley (Ben Gazzara), has control over most of Jasper. When Dalton manages to incur Wesley's wrath by removing Wesley's henchmen from the Double Deuce after an altercation, Wesley seeks revenge on Dalton, and those near to him. It's tough, and Dalton calls for back-up from his mentor and friend Wade Garrett (Sam Elliott). It's a very silly film, but there's something quite endearing about it. There's a good score of rock songs performed by Jeff Healey (who plays Cody in the film). Swayze can kick ass as well, and he's good in the love scenes with Kelly Lynch. It's the sort of action film that just doesn't exist anymore. 4/5



Lovesick (1983), written and directed by Marshall Brickman (who worked with Woody Allen on the scripts for Sleeper, Annie Hall and Manhattan), this is an amusing and warmly funny romantic comedy. It also has a good cast, and Brickman does well with the romance and the comedy, and it's something that could have been weaved from Brickman's former writing partner. Psychologist Saul Benjamin (Dudley Moore) is asked to take on a patient as a favour to a late friend, the patient is Chloe Allen (Elizabeth McGovern) and after their first session, Saul falls hopelessly in love with Chloe. But, Chloe is already in a relationship with arrogant Broadway actor Ted Caruso (Ron Silver), but Saul's wife Katie (Anne Kerry) is having an affair with artist Jac Applezweig (Larry Rivers). But as Saul wants to be with Chloe, Saul is frequently visited by the ghost of Sigmund Freud (Alec Guinness), who appears to heed warnings about the dangers of a doctor having a relationship with a patient, and Saul's obsession with Chloe means he's abandoning his patients, and it throws his life into disarray, and he has to choose between love or helping the sick. It's a gentle romantic comedy, not all of the jokes work, but when they do they're funny. Moore and McGovern make good romantic leads, while Guinness is endearing and funny as Freud, and there's good support from John Huston, Christine Baranski, David Strathairn and Wallace Shawn. 3/5



Elmer Gantry (1960), directed by Richard Brooks (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), Lord Jim (1965) and $ (1971)), this is a powerful and dramatic film based on Sinclair Lewis's 1927 satirical novel, but the film version only adapted 100 pages of Lewis's 465 page book. But, it still makes for a powerful if overlong epic, which is carried by one powerhouse performance. In the 1920's, Elmer Gantry (Burt Lancaster) is a hard-drinking travelling salesman, but he is charismatic and friendly. One evening, he attends the travelling roadshow of Sister Sharon Falconer (Jean Simmons). Attracted by the business the evangelists get, Gantry cons his way into the roadshow, and takes on the persona of a fiery preacher. Gantry does a "good cop/bad cop" routine with his audience, telling them that they'll burn in hell for all eternity unless they repent, which alot of them do, sold by Gantry's theatrics. However when Gantry's former girlfriend Lulu Baines (Shirley Jones), now a prostitute, turns up, things go wrong, and she tries to win him back, but she's planning to frame him and ruin his reputation. However, Gantry is trying to win the heart of Sister Falconer. It's a powerful drama, and Lancaster is a good showman as well, and you actually believe what he's saying too, (he won an Oscar for this). Brooks keeps the mood up, and it has a shocking and literally fiery finale too. It's this that's influenced Paul Thomas Anderson with There Will Be Blood (2007) and The Master (2012) with it's explosive depictions of religion. 4/5



The Name of the Rose (1986), based upon Umberto Eco's allegedly "unfilmable" 1980 novel. French director Jean-Jacques Annaud (The Bear (1988), Seven Years in Tibet (1997) and Enemy at the Gates (2001)), creates a visually dark but beautiful whodunnit, with a brilliant cast and some staggering production design too. It might not have won Eco's approval, but it works for the screen. Set in a Benedictine Abbey in Northern Italy in 1327, unconformist monk William of Baskerville (Sean Connery), is asked by the Abbot (Michael Lonsdale) to help solve a murder which has occured on the eve of an important conference. He and his apprentice Adso of Melk (Christian Slater) investigate the murder, but to complicate matters, more deaths start occuring throughout the abbey. The murder looks like a suicide, but William concludes that it's not, and he's aided by deformed hunchback Salvatore (Ron Perlman), who reveals little bits in broken languages which is enough to pique William's suspicion. Then the Inquisition led by Bernardo Gui (F. Murray Abraham) arrives, and takes matters into his own hands, but not before William enters the restricted library, which the monks of the abbey have forbidden him from enterting. It's a very dark and very grotesque film, but it's well shot, and director Annaud gets good performances from his actors, the result is one of Connery's better roles, plus, the sets designed by the great Dante Ferretti and costumes by Gabriella Pescucci are mind-blowing and very authentic. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:24 am

SO MANY FILMS!! Shocked

_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Oct 05, 2012 4:33 am

Bloodstorm (1st view) - Aka Nazis At the Center Of the Earth, a title they should have kept really. I could be wrong but I think this is the first Asylum film I've seen. Anyways, any film that features Nazi UFOs and a robot Hitler must be great right? Well, perhaps if the main plot of the film didn't involve Dr Mengele and his experimentations - 2/5*





Looper (1st view) - Clever time travel drama. JGL is on top form and it;s the best Bruce Willis film in years. hated the kid in it though - 4/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:59 am

MacGruber (1st view) - A few good jokes but mostly a waste of space. Will Forte continues to be entirely useless - 2/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:08 am

Toy Story (20th+ view) - To date, this is the only Pixar film that I first saw out of the cinema. But still, when I saw it I fell in love with it. I was in my teens at the time, this was not the kind of film I was meant to love but love it I did. Almost 16 years and some two dozen viewings later, watching it again and I swear I’ve never loved it quite so much. I smiled and I laughed and I cried though every single second, my face was aching at the end. It’s genuine masterpiece. It’s that rare beast, a family film for all the family. Script, story, vocals, music, visuals, everything is brilliant. It’s pure perfection, and that happens all too rarely. A film to be treasured - 5/5





The Guard (1st view) - Great,. In an ideal world Brendan Gleeson would be a massive star - 4/5*




_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:22 am

Sliver (1993), adapted from Ira Levin's 1991 bestseller, adapted here by Joe Eszterhas (alarm bells ringing), and directed by Phillip Noyce (Dead Calm (1989), Patriot Games (1992) and Clear and Present Danger (1994)), this is a dirty little film that opened to much hype upon release. It should have been a good erotic thriller, but most of it comes across as being more dull than interesting, pity really, as it had potential. Set in New York City, it starts when book editor Carly Norris (Sharon Stone) moves into an exclusive and fancy apartment block, known as a sliver building. She's moved in not long after one of it's tenants Naomi Singer (Allison Mackie) fell to her death from a balcony. Naomi's death has left a sad mood across the building. Carly becomes friends with Zeke Hawkins (William Baldwin), who becomes her gym partner and then lover. Carly then meets another tenant, Jack Landsford (Tom Berenger), a successful novelist who also takes a fancy to Carly. But, Carly discovers Jack has a secret, and that Zeke has an even bigger one. This film is not the "delightful romp" that Mr. Burns off The Simpsons makes it out to be. Razz It's a sensationalist film that gave audiences the chance to see Stone get 'em off again. It promises so much, but a lot of it was cut out after director Noyce and Paramount clashed with the MPAA, who originally slapped it with an NC-17, so most of it was refilmed. But it was made at a time when Eszterhas was a hot screenwriter, and then he made Showgirls... Razz 2/5



Don Juan DeMarco (1995), the directorial debut of screenwriter Jeremy Levin (The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000), The Notebook (2004) and Real Steel (2011)) and produced by Francis Ford Coppola. This is a heartwarming romantic comedy drama which takes the old legend created by Lord Byron and turns it on it's head. It has some good performances in it, and even a very good one from one of Hollywood's most eccentric actors. Psychiatrist Jack Mickler (Marlon Brando) is called to help someone looking like they'll commit suicide, John Arnold DeMarco (Johnny Depp), who is dressed as Zorro, and claiming to be Don Juan. Mickler is to retire soon, but he agrees to take on DeMarco as his final case, but Mickler only has 10 days to help Demarco's delussion. DeMarco tells Mickler his story, that he was born in Mexico, and when he was older, he spent time in a harem, then on a desert island. Listening to DeMarco's tales helps Mickler rekindle his cold relationship with his wife Marilyn (Faye Dunaway), and Mickler finds himself compelled by DeMarco's tales. It's a good little film, and it's that most rarest of beasts, a Brando film where he turns in a good performance, and this sort of part suits him, and he and Depp work well together. It mixes the present days scenes with the moments in a fairytale style Mexico with ease, and it's an enjoyable and funny tale. There's even parallels between this and what Depp would do later in POTC. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Oct 09, 2012 11:55 am

Under Capricorn (1949), after making Rope (1948), Alfred Hitchcock wanted to do something completely different, something that wasn't a suspense film. He settled on this period drama based on Helen de Guerry Simpson's 1937 book, it should have marked a new phase in Hitch's career, instead it flopped badly, it was repossessed by it's financiers and it wasn't seen for 20 years. Shame really, as it's quite lavish and showed Hitchcock could be quite versatile with other genres. Set in Australia in 1831, Charles Adare (Wilding) arrives in Sydney from Ireland with his uncle, the new governor (Cecil Parker). No sooner than he's settled in, he meets successful businessman Samson Flusky (Joseph Cotten), who is now a reformed convict turned good. Charles meets Samson's wife, Lady Henrietta (Ingrid Bergman), who was a friend of Charles' sister back in Ireland years earlier. Samson is hoping Charles could help improve Henrietta's mood, but housekeeper Milly (Margaret Leighton) secretly loves Samson, and tries to drive Henrietta insane. It's a different kind of Hitchcock film, but it's well made and has some lovely Technicolor cinematography by Jack Cardiff. Hitch was going to film it in Australia, but instead filmed it at Elstree Studios and in California. If it had been successful, Hitch might have moved away from suspense films, however he went straight back into making them with Stage Fright (1950) and Strangers on a Train (1951), it would revive his career. 3/5



The Pope Must Die (1991), directed by Comic Strip leader Peter Richardson. This started off as a spoof for TV, examining the conspiracy theories surrounding Pope John Paul I's death and "God's Banker" Roberto Calvi. Richardson wanted to show the "Hill Street Blues side to the Vatican", Channel 4 turned it down, so did the BBC, but Richardson found money to make it from Bob and Harvey Weinstein. It's not a perfect comedy, but it's aged OK actually. In The Vatican, the Pope is dead, but the Vatican is controlled by the Mafia, led by Vittorio Corelli (Herbert Lom), who uses Cardinal Rocco (Alex Rocco) to convince the conclave to elect the Mafia's choice Albini (Janez Vajevec). However, due to a "clerical error" by deaf Father Rookie (Adrian Edmondson), the newly elected Pope is Father Dave Albinizi (Robbie Coltrane), who is a honest man who plays the electric guitar. No sooner than he's in, Dave discovers secret accounts in the Vatican Bank, leading Corelli to try to bring the Pope down, but they dig some major dirt on him. It's not a perfect film, but it's a lot better than the critics then made it out to be, and it's maybe in need of a reappraisal. Coltrane is good as the Pope, and despite the controversy this caused (it was called The Pope Must Diet in America), it has it's moments, and it has a good ensemble cast including Paul Bartel, Annette Crosbie, Balthazar Getty, John Sessions and Beverly D'Angelo. It's stood the test of time, and feels more relevant now with Vatican scandals now in the news. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Oct 09, 2012 1:53 pm

Irma Vep (1996), directed by Olivier Assayas, (Cold Water (1994), Boarding Gate (2007) and Summer Hours (2008)), this is a very offbeat comedy-drama which takes a candid look at filmmaking and turns it on it's head more than once or twice. It was meant as a comment on French cinema in the mid-1990's, and what was going on, but it owes a debt of gratitude to François Truffaut's Day For Night (1973), which Assayas cites as heavy inspiration. It has Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung (playing herself) coming to France to act in a remake of Les Vampires (1915), being reimagined by director René Vidal (Jean-Pierre Léaud). Cheung will be playing the part of Irma Vep (an anagram of vampire), who spends most of the film remake dressed in a tight, black, latex rubber catsuit. However, as time goes on, Cheung finds herself becoming Irma Vep, and finds herself going out acreoss the rooftops of Paris in the catsuit, meanwhile the film's costume designer Zoe (Nathalie Richard) and director Vidal develop love crushes on Cheung as Irma Vep. It's a very original way of doing a film within a film, and the film switches back and forth between French and English at the flick of a switch, and it has some weird montages too, but it's a look about the nightmares directors face when making films and the horror at having to compromise. Assayas does good with the material and it's a good way of doing a remake, show it from another perspective, pull and and show it being made. 4/5



To Kill A King (2003), directed by Mike Barker (Best Laid Plans (1999) and Butterfly on a Wheel (2007)), this historical drama had a nightmarish production, it started life as Cromwell and Fairfax, to have starred Jude Law and Ewan McGregor in 2000. Then the funding fell through, they started again with a different cast, the funding fell through again during filming, then FilmFour went under. Despite all this, it's a lavish film, even if it is a little cliched. Set in 1648, towards the end of the English Civil War, Sir Thomas Fairfax (Dougray Scott) is leading a crusade against the Royalist Cavaliers, with his fellow commander, Oliver Cromwell (Tim Roth). They discover a lot of betrayal and skulduggery within Parliament, there are those who have allegiances to the King, Charles I (Rupert Everett), who is under house arrest. Charles tries to get Fairfax's wife Lady Anne (Olivia Williams) to convince her husband and Cromwell to spare him, but Cromwell's mind is made up, and tensions between him and Fairfax grow, as Cromwell starts to abuse his power. It's a good period drama, but it might have been better suited to TV, but Roth and Scott make good leads, with Everett perfectly cast as the foppish king Charles. Evidence of the cost-cutting the went on during it's troubled production does show in some places, but it's a good thing they got it finished. It's a shame that hardly anyone went to see it, but there doesn't seem to be that much call for costume dramas these days, unless it's fantasy based. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Oct 09, 2012 3:14 pm

When Harry Met Sally (1989), directed by Rob Reiner (This Is Spinal Tap (1984), Stand By Me (1986) and Misery (1990)) and written by the late Nora Ephron, (Sleepless in Seattle (1993) and You've Got Mail (1998)), this is a very funny romantic comedy which started life as a series of recorded conversations between Reiner and Ephron talking about their experiences in relationships. It view on how relationships develop is candid, real and very funny. It begins in 1977 in Chicago, where Harry Burns (Billy Crystal) and Sally Albright (Meg Ryan) share a car trip to New York. Harry is dating Sally's friend Amanda (Michelle Nicastro), and they talk about relationships and how they develop. Harry and Sally meet again 5 years later, this time on a plane, and get talking again. Then they meet again 5 years later in a book store, and rekindle their friendship, they try to set each other up with their friends Marie (Carrie Fisher) and Jess (Bruno Kirby), but it's Marie and Jess who end up in a relationship together, leaving Harry and Sally wondering whether they should commit. It's a very funny film, best known for the fake orgasm in the deli ("I'll have what she's having!") Crystal is a great actor, with a brilliant deadpan face, while Ryan gets some good laughs too. It's maybe the high water mark of Reiner's career, and he's always been in his element with comedy like this, but he's a director who can turn his attention to most genres and make something interesting. 4.5/5



Daddy and Them (2001), written and directed by Billy Bob Thornton, who had won an Oscar for his screenplay for Sling Blade (1996), he filmed this in 1998, but Miramax wouldn't release it, and said they would if he did All The Pretty Horses (2000) first. Thornton did and they shafted him over that too. It's a shame, as there's something warmly funny about this film, showing the pains of family loyalty in rural America. Set in Arkanas, Claude Montgomery (Thornton) and his wife Ruby (Laura Dern), get a call regarding Claude's uncle Hazel (Jim Varney), who has been thrown in jail for an alleged attempted murder. So they drive across state to sort this out, Claude and Ruby travel with Ruby's mother Jewell (Diane Ladd) and sister Rose (Kelly Preston). They get there, Claude's father O.T. (Andy Griffith) straightens them out on what's happened, and Jewell regales O.T.'s new wife, Julia (Brenda Blethyn), about Claude and Ruby's insecure and rocky relationship, which adds to the already tense atmosphere, then Hazel is released... It's a frank look at redneck life in middle America, and it's close in tone to a Mike Leigh film, (especially with Blethyn in it), but Thornton makes the most of the cast, getting the best out of the most the cast, including cameos from Jamie Lee Curtis and Ben Affleck. It's a little seen black comedy, and Thornton has only just got behind the camera again recently for Jayne Mansfield's Car (2012).

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Wed Oct 10, 2012 4:26 am

Captivity (1st view) - Attractive woman gets locked up in a basement by a deranged psycho. Yep, nothing really new here. Well, to be fair I've never seen anyone force fed blended human body parts before, so I suppose that''s new - 3/5*




Taken (2nd view) - When Liam Neeson's daughter get kidnapped in Paris, he goes on a one-man mission to get her back. As an ex-CIA, he's proficient in gunplay, hand-to-hand combat and torture. It's the kind of film where you have to suspend belief. Neeson leaves a trail of destruction and death across Paris, yet seems to come away clean, not having to answer to anyone. It's a Steven Segal flick with an A-list actor, and the film is best when you forget the lurid storyline and watch Neeson in action as the rock hard, take-no-prisoners "preventer” - 4/5




Taken 2 (1st view) - And this is more of the same, but with bigger roles for Maggie Grace and Famke Janssen. Edited to within an inch if its life though, makes Michael Bays action scenes look elegant - 4/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:15 am

Gag (1st view) - A few weeks ago I saw Jurassic Shark and said that it was so bad it made the Room look like Citizen Kane. Well, Gag makes Jurassic Shark look like The Room. It's a grotty and vile little film but not really worse than horror films that make megabucks in terms of gore (though I did wince at one death scene that involved pointed stick, but only before my mind wandered to Monty Python and "Suppose he's got a pointed stick" Laughing ). But the film is just terrible in every way.


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We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Thu Oct 11, 2012 4:13 am

Triangle (1st view) - Brain-bending psychological horror. Very effective - 4/5*


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:22 am

The Wicked Lady (1983), directed by Michael Winner (alarm bells ringing) and produced by Cannon Films (second alarm bell), this is a remake of Leslie Arliss's 1945 film of the same name which in turn was based on The Life and Death of the Wicked Lady Skelton by Magdalen King-Hall. However, instead of doing a new adaptation of the book, Winner just remake the original film with added sex and nudity. How typical of him. Lady Barbara Skelton (Faye Dunaway) has recently married the rich Sir Ralph Skelton (Denholm Elliott), who was originally to have married Barbara's sister Caroline (Glynis Barber), before Barbara seduced Sir Ralph. Despite having many riches and a new found social standing, Barbara is bored with it all, and she turns to highway robbery as a thrill. However, she soon meets another highwayman in Jerry Jackson (Alan Bates), who claims HE has the right to rob the main road, but after a while, they team up and commit robberies together. However, it's not long before the law comes down on them both with force. It's exactly the sort of sleazy filth you would expect from Winner, who had just come off Death Wish 2. You can't imagine this sort of bawdy sexuality happening back then, but Winner just doesn't know when to stop. It's most infamous scene was a scene where Dunaway and Barber go at each other with horsewhips, which was a big problem for the censors here. If Winner had done a more traditional retelling of the book, it might have worked. 2/5



Say Anything... (1989), the directorial debut of Cameron Crowe, who before this had been a journalist for Rolling Stone magazine and got into Hollywood when he wrote Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982). This is a sweet romantic comedy-drama about the growing pains of what comes after we finish High School, and about having to move on and grow up. It's themes that Crowe has examined in all of his films, and he got his directing career off to a good start here. Set in Seattle, Lloyd Dobler (John Cusack) is a High School student and aspiring kickboxer who has just graduated, and is unsure about where he's going to go after this. Lloyd meets valedictorian Diane Court (Ione Skye), who has just won a major fellowship to study in England. Lloyd falls in love with Diane, and tries to start a relationship with her. At first, Diane is indifferent, but she's taken in by his persistence. However, Diane's father Jim (John Mahoney), does not approve of her dating a slacker like Lloyd, but Jim has big troubles of his own with the IRS. It's a sweet 80's movie with a good soundtrack, Cusack had a likeable charm about him and he still does to this day. The film itself is not perfect, but it doesn't need to be, it's got something about it, and it's enjoyable while it lasts too, and it's a good timepiece of the end of the 1980's, and also about saying goodbye to your childhood, and learning to adapt to adulthood, and the challenges that throws. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Oct 12, 2012 11:59 am

The Girl With The Pearl Earring (2003), directed by Peter Webber (Hannibal Rising (2007)) and based upon the 1999 book by Tracy Chevalier, this is a classy and unfussy period drama that explores a fictional history over the creation of the most famous paintings of the 17th century. It has a good cast in it, and it captures the era well. It is a bit over the top in places, but it's good to watch. Set in Dutch Republic in 1665, shy maid Griet (Scarlett Johansson) is sent to work in the household of painter Johannes Vermeer (Colin Firth), Griet's family have hit hard financial times after Griet's father goes blind, so Griet is grateful for work like this. The atmosphere in the Vermeer household is anything but harmonious, Vermeer's children are nasty to Griet but when Griet finally becomes acquainted with Vermeer himself, he becomes obsessed with her. Not in a romantic way, but seeing her enables him to unlock his creative floodgates, and he wishes to paint her in a picture, but she's reluctant although Vermeer's financier Van Ruijven (Tom Wilkinson) convinces her. It's a classy film with a nice gentle touch to it, it's got a good score by Alexandre Desplat, it's does resort to period drama cliches like two-faced divas and brooding men, but Johansson beautifully underplays Griet and Firth makes a good tortured Vermeer. We'll never know the true identity of who the girl in the picture really was, but it's a good theory as to who it could have been. 3.5/5



Collateral Damage (2002), directed by Andrew Davis (Under Siege (1992), The Fugitive (1993) and Holes (2003)), this is a very silly action-drama, which was intended to show it's star could play a grieving man, but bad CGI and some ropey acting and dialogue mar the whole experience sadly. It made headlines when it was delayed by 5 months because of 9/11 happening, it comes across as dull rather than exciting. Fireman Gordy Brewer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is left reeling when his wife Anne (Lindsay Frost) and young son Matt (Ethan Dampf). They were caught up in a terrorist bombing in a restaurant next door to the Colombian Consulate. Left grieving and angry at what happened, Brewer is left even more angry when he's told by CIA Special Agent Peter Brandt (Elias Koteas) that they're not going to do anything. So Brewer goes to Colombia, with a view of finding El Lobo, who was behind the bombing. Brewer believes it's Claudio Perrini (Cliff Curtis), and he is aided by mechanic Sean Armstrong (John Turturro). It's has good intentions, and watching this it makes you believe this is the reason Arnie gave up acting for politics. It has it's moments, but the terrorist explosions have very bad CGI. It could have done with a better script and poor Arnie just seems out of place in this film. It's not his fault, but it has a good supporting cast including Francesca Neri, Jane Lynch and John Leguizamo. It offered so much but fails to deliver. 2/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Oct 12, 2012 12:33 pm

And When Did You Last See Your Father? (2007), directed by Anand Tucker, (Hilary and Jackie (1998), Shopgirl (2005) and Leap Year (2010)), this is based on the 1993 memoir by author Blake Harrison, here adapted by novelist David Nicholls, (Starter for 10 and One Day), it's a good film with two powerful lead performances, and it captures the eras it's set in well too, it's about father and son bonding and the ups and downs it has. It is 1989, and novelist Blake Harrison (Colin Firth) is tending to his father Arthur (Jim Broadbent), who is slowly dying of cancer. Blake remembers the life he has had with his father, when Blake told his father that he wanted to be a writer, Arthur never supported it, as he was a rural general practitioner in rural Yorkshire, an he was hoping Blake was going to follow him into that profession too. Arthur has a tendency for embarrassing Blake at the worst possible opportunity, and hampering his chances with girls, both Arthur was also able to bond with Blake when the time was right, and those times were incredible. It's a very good film, it comes across like a non-fantastical version of Big Fish (2003), but it's got a good supporting cast including Juliet Stevenson, Gina McKee, Sarah Lancashire and Carey Mulligan. Firth makes a good, frustrated Blake Morrison, who is simultaneously infuriated by his father and he also loves and respects him. Broadbent is brilliant, and somehow manages to steal the film from everyone else. 4/5



The Campaign (2012), directed by Jay Roach (Austin Powers and Meet the Parents), this is a very silly and quite rude political comedy which is also downright hilarious. It could have just been another political comedy, but it has two hilarious leads that manage to elevate it to something else, the material is offensive in places, but the jokes work and it pokes fun at the skulduggery that happens during elections. In the 14th District of North Carolina, Democratic Congressman Cam Brady (Will Ferrell) is standing for election, but his popularity is waning after a sexually explicit phone call is sent to the wrong address. To counteract this, businessmen brothers Glen (John Lithgow) and Wade Motch (Dan Aykroyd) champion happy-go-lucky local tourist director Marty Huggins (Zach Galifianakis) to stand for the Republican seat. It leads to a bitter rivalry between Cam and Marty, and they play dirty in the campaigns against one another, but Marty soon learns the truth over why the Motch brothers are wanting Marty to win the election. It's a very silly film, and there's some moments where you think "I can't believe he said that!!", but Ferrell and Galifianakis play off one another brilliantly, and Roach gets the best out of his cast. The films timing couldn't be anymore perfect with the Presidential elections heating up in America at the minute. This sends up the ridiculousness and the gusto that some electorate hopefuls actually put into their campaigns. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Oct 12, 2012 1:12 pm

F/X (1986), directed by Robert Mandel (School Ties (1992)), this is a very good suspense thriller that shows all the tricks of the trade when it comes to making films. It was made for a pittance, but it would become a very successful film in 1986, and would eventually spawn a sequel. It's a product of it's time, and it makes you pine for the good old days of special effects, as this film is a good showcase for them. Australian special effects man Rollie Tyler (Bryan Brown), works in America doing on screen effects for films from explosions to monster make up to blood squibs for shooting. But he gets an unusual offer from Lipton (Cliff DeYoung), a government agent working for Justice Department. Lipton wants Tyler to stage the assassination of mob informant Nicholas DeFranco (Jerry Orbach). Tyler is reluctant, but he's assured he'll be 100% protected afterwards. The staged assassination goes well, but then Lipton tries to kill Tyler but Tyler escapes and goes on the run, and Leo McCarthy (Brian Dennehy) ends up trying to work out what's happen, and Tyler has to stay one step ahead of the Justice Department. It's a very good film, and it has some good special effects too. It's got all the hallmarks of an 80's action film, but it's still enjoyable today. It's a film that would be impossible to remake, as CGI has take over from effects like the ones portrayed in the film. Plus, you hardly ever see Bryan Brown or Brian Dennehy these days, pity really as they're good actors. 4/5



Heaven & Earth (1993), the third film in Oliver Stone's Vietnam Trilogy after Platoon (1986) and Born on the Fourth of July (1989). This one was a little different, based on two books, When Heaven and Earth Changed Places and Child of War, Woman of Peace, which Le Ly Hayslip, and it showed the Vietnam War from the side of the Vietnamese. It sank without trace at the time, which is a shame, as it's better than what people makes it out to be, alot better in fact. It tells the epic story of Le Ly (Hiep Thi Le), who grew up in a small Vietnamese village, and got her first taste of war in the 1950's when the communist insurgents show up to fight against the French troops. 10 years later, the Vietnam war starts and she's captured by the South Vietnamese troops and she's raped by the Viet Cong. But, she meets Steve Butler (Tommy Lee Jones), a Gunnery Sergeant in the Marines, and she finds solace in him, and he falls for her and takes her back to America. She is overwhelmed by all the things America has that Vietnam doesn't, but all is not wine and roses in the land of freedom. It's a moving and epic film, it's a surprisingly sensitive film too. Newcomer Hiep Thi Le gives a brilliant performance as Le Ly, and Jones shows a sensitive if tortured side, and there's support from Joan Chen, Haing S. Ngor and Debbie Reynolds. It's got amazing cinematography by Robert Richardson, and it's one in need of a reappraisal as it's maybe one of the best Vietnam films ever made. 4.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sun Oct 14, 2012 4:08 am

Battleship (1st view) - Unfairly maligned, this is a great action blockbuster. It can join the list of Master and Commander, Sahara and John Carter as films I really want to get a sequel buut I know it'll never happen - 4/5*





Salmon Fishing In The Yemen (1st view) - Slight story but made worthwhile by winning performances from Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt - 4/5*


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Oct 16, 2012 4:19 am

We Bought A Zoo (1st view) - Before 6 months ago I'd never been impressed by Scarlett Johansson in anything but with this and the Avengers maybe she's not as bad as I thought. A slight tale but very easy to like - 4/5*




The Raven (1st view) - Fictionalised horror telling of the last days of Edgar Allen Poe's life. The Brois Karloff/Vincent Price film is way better - 3/5*




Frozen River (1st view) - Bleak. Melissa Leo is very good - 4/5*




Savage Grace (1st view) - So amazingly OTT at time I couldn't help but like it more than I think I should have but it's hard to think of a film with so many unlikeable characters - 3/5*




Contraband (1st view) - Decent-ish thriller - 3/5*




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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Thu Oct 18, 2012 4:02 am

The 25th Reich (1st view) - I think it's safe to say that I never thought I'd see a film in which a man gets raped by a giant redneck nazi mutant robot spider! Shocked



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Behold! We are the Nine,
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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Thu Oct 18, 2012 7:10 pm

The Draughtsman's Contract (1982), written and directed by Peter Greenaway, who had worked since the late 1960's on numerous short films and later the mockumentary The Falls (1980), here he finally broke into cinema when Channel 4, then about to start up asked him for a film. It was originally made for TV, but after screenings at festivals, it made the jump to the big screen. It's a very weird period piece, and it is an acquired taste. Set in 1694 in rural Wiltshire, landscape artist Mr. Neville (Anthony Higgins) is approached by Mrs. Virginia Herbert (Janet Suzman), who asks Mr. Neville to produce 12 drawings of her country estate for her estranged husband (). Mr. Neville is reluctant at first to partake in this, but agrees to do so, as long as it's on his terms with no interruptions. However, Mr. Neville and Mrs. Herbert are having an affair between drawing times, and things take a dark turn when Mr. Herbert turns up dead on the grounds of the estate. By this point Mrs. Herbert has grown tired of Mr. Neville, who refuses to stop his drawings when she tries to terminate the contract. Greenaway's films are not for everybody, in fact his brand of film-making makes directors like Ken Russell look normal. But, it's well filmed and Greenaway gives it an almost otherworldly feel, from the costumes by Sue Blane (Rocky Horror) contrasted with a good score by Michael Nyman. Greenaway's original cut was three hours long, and included a scene with a cordless phone. What could have been. 3.5/5



Howl (2010), written and directed by Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman (The Times of Harvey Milk (1984) and The Celluloid Closet (1995)), this is a very offbeat and experimental biopic of how Allen Ginsberg came to create his 1955 poem Howl, and the trouble it caused in it's wake. Doing films about writing can be tricky, they can come across as too dull or too weird, but this finds a comfortable middle ground, even if it is very weird. Howl doesn't just look at how Allen Ginsberg (James Franco) came to create the titular poem, but it focuses on his life at that time too, from the late 1940's and into the 1950's and how he came to become one of the most renowned of the Beat Poets. It shows Ginsberg performing a debut reading of Howl at the Six Gallery Reading in San Francisco on October 7, 1955. It's also juxtaposed with a obscenity trial of San Francisco poet and City Lights Bookstore co-founder, Lawrence Ferlinghetti (Andrew Rogers), who in 1957 published the poem in a book called "Howl and Other Poems". Ginsberg's poem is brought to life with animation throughout. It's a very offbeat film, but Franco gives a very good performance as Ginsberg, a man who kept to himself but was a leading figure in the Beat Generation. It makes the most of cinematic techniques, and shifts between animation and live action at the flick of a switch. It's not for everyone though, and whether or not you've read the poem, you'll want to read it as soon as the film finishes. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:19 am

Orphans Of The Storm (1st view) - Back when I saw The Artist I said the following regarding silent films - "the dramas are usually melodramatic dreariness filled with overacted, histrionic mugging and contemptible music". Apart from the music, which was really good, Orphans of the Storm, a tale of two sisters caught up in the French revolution, suffers from the same problems. It's hugely melodramatic, basically pounding you over the head with scene after scene of sensationalised exaggeration but it so revels in the fact that it is so melodramatic it becomes wonderfully glorious. And the acting, from every single person, even the extras, is so lavishly OTT it's hard not to like despite every fibre of my being wanting to yell at these people and tell them to take it down a notch, but it really suited the excesses of the film. One of the breeziest 150 minutes of film I've seen, the whole thing was both grand and grandiose. It's the first DW Griffith film I've seen and I'm looking forward to seeing more - 5/5*


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sun Oct 21, 2012 12:26 am

The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012), based upon the 1999 book of the same name by Stephen Chbosky, who wrote and directed this film version, this is a dark romantic dramedy. Not enough laughs to be classed as a comedy, but with moments of lightness and quirkiness meaning it's not quite a drama. It could be just another teen film, but it has some brilliant performances which make it something else. Set in Pittsburgh, Charlie (Logan Lerman) is a nervous and isolated teenager who has had a troubled past, and he's about to start his first day at High School. He's not got many friends, and he struggles to make some in his first few days at school, but he soon finds himself making friends with Sam (Emma Watson), and her step-brother Patrick (Erza Miller), and after accidentally eating a hash brownie, where Charlie spurts off humourous observations, becomes a popular kid in the school. However, Charlie has a crush on Sam, but he soon finds himself in a relationship with Sam and Patrick's friend Mary Elizabeth (Mae Whitman), who's a bit clingy. It's a weird romance, but it's the power of the performances that give it that certain something. Miller, best known for We Need To Talk About Kevin, just about steals the film with a role that's a revelation, and Miller will go on to greater things. It has a good supporting cast including Paul Rudd and Joan Cusack, and while it's dark turn towards the end mars things slightly, this is a very sweet and heartfelt. 3.5/5



A Perfect Murder (1998), directed by Andrew Davis (The Fugitive (1993), Chain Reaction (1996) and Holes (2003)), this is a new readaptation of Frederick Knott's play, which was famously done by Hitchcock. This is done with a modern attitude and a starry cast, but it has varying results. It's not a remake of Hitchcock's version, but there's something theatrical about it all, and it has some good staged moments. Wall Street investor Steven Taylor (Michael Douglas) has a marriage with younger wife Emily (Gwyneth Paltrow), but he discovers she's been unfaithful, and is having an affair with aspiring artist David Shaw (Viggo Mortensen). David was a convict, which Steven knows about it, and says he'll reveal it. But Steven offers David $500,000 to kill Emily, and he can start his new life, if he doesn't, Steven will reveal info of a crime David committed in Florida. So, the stage is set, and it's made to look like a robbery gone wrong, and things go awry when Emily kills the burglar. Steven is shocked at what's happened, and Detective Karaman (David Suchet) tries to piece together what happened. It's a good thriller with some good performances, but it has a good cast, and Mortensen gives a good performance too, and it's good to see Suchet too, proving there was more to him than Poirot. Davis keeps the pace up, and it has a good payoff too, but Hitchcock's take on Knott's play was better, if for it's technical inovation at the time. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:01 am

Dark Shadows (2012), based on Dan Curtis' cult soap opera that ran in America from 1966 to 1971, this affectionate but kitsch take on the soap by Tim Burton, his 8th film with star Johnny Depp is a passion project for them both as they used to watch the soap back in the day. It's a mish-mash of the soap's biggest storylines, some of it works, some of it doesn't, but it does make for a fun film. In the 18th Century, Barnabas Collins (Depp) broke the heart of witch Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green), who turns him into a vampire and has him chained up in a coffin. In 1972, Barnabas is freed into a strange, new world and returns to his home to Collinwood Manor, which is inhabited by his descendants Elizabeth Collins Stoddard (Michelle Pfeiffer) and her brother Roger (Jonny Lee Miller), with Elizabeth's daughter Carolyn (Chloë Grace Moretz), Roger's son David (Gulliver McGrath), with live-in psychiatrist Dr. Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter), governess Victoria Winters (Bella Heathcote) and caretaker Willie Loomis (Jackie Earle Haley). Barnabas wants to restore Collinwood Manor and get the family business back up and running, but when Angelique returns, old wounds are reopened, and it's not going to be pretty. It's a fast and furious film that could have done with about 20 minutes more to explain a few things that seem up in the air, but it's well made and the set designs are brilliant. Depp is brilliant as always, and Burton's gothic touches are as class as always, but you do wonder if they'd bitten off more than they could chew with an epic soap opera like this?? It works though, but only just. 4/5



Frankenweenie (2012), the second Tim Burton film of 2012, and this one is his remake of his 1984 short film that caused him to get sacked from Disney, but now he's back in Disney's good books after making $1 billion for them with Alice in Wonderland (2010), Burton had absolute carte blanche on this one. It's one in a stark but beautiful black and white, and it's great to see Burton back doing animation once again. Set in New Holland, young Victor Frankenstein (Charlie Tahan) makes short films with his beloved dog Sparky, who is accidentally knocked down and killed by a car. Victor is distraught, and wants his dog back, and after seeing the effect of electricity on dead frogs by eccentric science teacher Mr. Rzykruski (Martin Landau), Victor get the idea of bringing Sparky back to life. Using stuff from around the house, and a violent thunder storm, he is able to bring Sparky back to life. However, deformed local kid Edgar "E" Gore (Atticus Shaffer) learns about what Victor has done, and it's not long before other kids want to try out what Victor has done on their own pets. It's darkly funny but it also has a black and white heart of gold, it shows pure, unfiltered Burton and he should be doing more animated films like this. Stop-motion films may take forever to make, but it's well worth the wait. Even in black and white, it evokes all the classic horror films of old, with Burton regulars Catherine O'Hara, Martin Short and Winona Ryder in the cast, and Christopher Lee in Hammer's Dracula. Wink 4.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:19 am

Don't Go In The House (1st view) - Video nasty about a disturbed man who blowtorches his victims to death. Not as grim as the premise would have you believe - 3/5*


_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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