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 What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock

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PostSubject: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Fri Sep 14, 2012 12:48 am

Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009), Wes Anderson takes on Roald Dahl, and he does it with a primitive looking stop-motion animation, a step back from what you've seen with Aardman or even anything Tim Burton has worked on. The result is a likeable and unusual film, although you can see alot of Dahl's influence here, it's unmistakenly a Wes Anderson film through and through, and that's a good thing!! Very Happy Set in an old-fashioned looking England, it has Mr. Fox (George Clooney) moving into a tree on a hill with his family, Mrs. Fox (Meryl Streep), son Ash (Jason Schwartzman) and their visiting nephew Kristofferson (Eric Chase Anderson). But, although Mr. Fox gave up raiding a couple of years back, he goes off on one last raid with opossum Kylie (Wally Wolodarsky) to raid the stock of farmers Boggis (Robin Hurlstone), Bunce (Hugo Guinness) and Bean (Michael Gambon). But, when they ambush him and try to dig him out. They team up with other animals caught up in the farms digging them out to try and get their own back on the farmers, it goes to play at first, but Kristofferson ends up being kidnapped by the farmers, leading to a "go-for-broke-rescue-mission". It's a very unusual looking film, many will be put off by the animals with American accents. But, don't let that put you off, it's still a very enjoyable film, full of the usual quirks and humour that we've come to expect from Wes Anderson. The supporting vocal cast, including Bill Murray, Willem Dafoe and Owen Wilson are very enjoyable, and the soundtrack is the icing on a different kind of cake indeed!! Very Happy 4/5



The Squeeze (1977), directed by Michael Apted (Stardust (1974), Coal Miner's Daughter (1980) and The World Is Not Enough (1999)), this British gangster film is one of the best kept secrets of British gangster films, one that seems to have slipped through the cracks, but it's actually up there with films like Get Carter (1971) and The Long Good Friday (1981). It's well made and has a good cast too, all giving really good performances. Scotland Yard detective Jim Naboth (Stacy Keach) is washed up and an alcoholic, and he's just been in hospital for alcohol abuse, but he's cared for by ex-convict Teddy (Freddie Starr) who Jim had put away some years before. However, Jim finds himself over his head when he's told that his ex-wife Jill (Carol White) has been kidnapped by gangsters Keith (David Hemmings) and Vic (Stephen Boyd), and they want her new husband Foreman (Edward Fox) to pay up a hefty ransom, which he doesn't want to do. Foreman turns to Jim for help, and the gangsters don't know Jill was married to Jim, but they know of Jim as a washed up drunk, but Jim plans to clean up his act, and rescue Jill from the gangsters. It's a bloody good film, this London is down and dirty, and it comes out well on film. Keach handles an English accent well, but the real surprise is Freddie Starr, who manages to give a natural, warm performance. But, this is one to track down, as it's not your average British gangster film, and it's a lot more complex than that, and it shows what an underrated director Apted is. 4.5/5



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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Sep 17, 2012 10:41 pm

Shoot me down now but Avengers Assemble is a 3.5* film. Sorry just couldn't see what all the fuss was about.

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:02 am

No, it's called The Avengers, not that stupid title they gave it here to avoid confusion with the TV series and other film of the same name.

The Rose (1979), directed by Mark Rydell (The Cowboys (1972) and On Golden Pond (1981)), this is a musical drama cut from similiar cloth to A Star is Born (1976), but this was inspired by the life of Janis Joplin, and it did start out as a biopic of her life, but as the script progressed, it became something else, and it also the film debut of a great singer. The Rose tells the story of Mary Rose Foster (Bette Midler), who performs under the name of The Rose, she's managed by Rudge Campbell (Alan Bates), an English manager who pushes Rose to the limit, and she wants to take a break to recharge her batteries, but Rudge supplies her with drugs and shots of adrenalin to keep her going, but she's trying to get off drugs, even if she is addicted to alcohol. After a run in with obnoxious country singer Billy Ray (Harry Dean Stanton), who tells her she can't sing any more of his songs because he believes she's a spent force, Rose finds solace in Huston Dyer (Frederic Forrest), and they soon start a romance, but Rudge isn't happy by Huston's presence, and he believes it'll distract Rose from her touring commitments. Huston is actually AWOL from the Army, but Rose doesn't care, she thinks this could be a new beginning for her. It's the same old rise-and-fall rock and roll film, but it's well filmed and it has some lovely performances in it. Midler is brilliant, and she can hold a note and act brilliantly too, and Alan Bates plays well against type, after years of English period dramas and plays. Rydell films the concert scenes well, and there's some good music too. Ken Russell nearly made this film, but he turned it down in favour of Valentino (1977), imagine what could have been... 3/5



Soldier (1998), a film by Paul W.S. Anderson. Wait, don't go!! It's actually good, very good in fact. Written by David Peoples, (who wrote Blade Runner, Unforgiven and Twelve Monkeys), it's essentially a sci-fi western, crossed somewhere between Shane and Mad Max, leaning more towards the latter. But, it's a film which decides to be old school, and not rely on CGI all the time. It's good dumb action fun. Set in an alternate future, this depicts humans selected at birth to become soulless killing machines, one such soldier is Todd (Kurt Russell) who is declared obsolete after Colonel Mekum (Jason Isaacs, with a comedy moustache) announces he has genetically created new soldiers, which include Caine 607 (Jason Scott Lee). Todd is banished to waste disposal planet Arcadia 234, where Todd discovers a colony of humans, living amongst the waste after a crash years earlier. But when Colonel Mekum sends his GM soldiers on a training exercise to Arcadia 234, and are told to kill any humans on site, it's time for Todd to fight back!! It's a silly film, but it's well made, and the waste planet is well thought out and designed. When Anderson puts his mind to it, he can make good films. It was a massive flop on release, and went straight to video in the UK, which Anderson was upset about. Russell just grunts for most of the film, but it has a good supporting cast including Gary Busey, Michael Chiklis and Sean Pertwee!! 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:04 am

A Beautiful Mind (2001), directed by Ron Howard, this was a change of pace to the comedic antics of EdTV (1999) and How The Grinch Stole Christmas (2000). This was a true life drama about a maverick American genius, and his mental struggle. It's got some lovely performances, but it's not the modern classic people made it out to be, and it somehow would go on to win Best Picture and Best Director at the Oscars that year, still it's not that bad. It begins in 1947, when John Nash (Russell Crowe) arrives at Princeton University to study advanced mathematics, but he has an unorthodox way of doing things, and he won't attend classes. He becomes friends with English student Charles Herman (Paul Bettany). Despite expectations that Nash will fail, he succeeds and gets a job at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a few years later, gets to help the Pentagon encrypted enemy telecommunication from the Soviets. He reports to supervisor William Parcher (Ed Harris), who gives him assignments. Meanwhile, Nash falls for student Alicia Larde (Jennifer Connelly), and they marry. But Alicia notices something is not right about Nash going off on these cloak and dagger assignments, something just isn't there. It's well filmed, and Crowe gives a good performance as the tormented Nash, and Howard is always a good director of actors, but it's a shame he won an Oscar for a film that isn't even his best, he should have won it for something like Apollo 13 (1995) or Frost/Nixon (2008), and it is a bit overlong and sentimental. 3.5/5



Conan the Barbarian (2011), after years in development hell, going from studio to studio and passed by directors like John Milius, the Wachowski's and Brett Ratner. This reinterpretation of Robert E. Howard's creation finally got made by Marcus Nispel (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) and Friday the 13th (2009)). It promises so much, but it's all half-cocked and it's a hotch-potch of action and adventure. In the Continent of Hyboria, evil warlord Khalar Zym (Stephen Lang) has been searching the land for pieces of the Mask of Acheron, which will revive his dead wife and ensure he conquers Hyboria. He ends up killing barbarian chief Corin (Ron Perlman), whose son Conan (Jason Momoa) grows up seeking revenge against Khalar Zym. Conan travels the land, freeing slaves and killing their handlers. But, he meets thief Ela-Shan (Sa´d Taghmaoui), who Conan see's as a way to get closer to Khalar Zym. Meanwhile, Khalar Zym and his sorceress daughter Marique (Rose McGowan) attack a monastery, monk Fassir (Raad Rawi) tells student Tamara (Rachel Nichols) to find help, and she finds it with Conan, who she teams up with to get even against Khalar Zym. It's a simple revenge story, which just happens to be set in a sword and sorcery setting. It's well made, but something is not right, it's derivative and it's been done before. It makes you wish Milius' King Conan with Arnie had happened when it had happened when they had the chance. This was due to have started a new Conan franchise, but it sank without trace. 2/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:04 am

The Admirable Crichton (1957), directed by Lewis Gilbert (Alfie (1966) You Only Live Twice (1967) and Educating Rita (1983)), this is an amusing, comedic adventure based on J. M. Barrie's 1902 stage play (there was more to him than Peter Pan). It's a great little British film with a lovely location too, and a good little ensemble at it's centre. It's tight, focused and to the point, and it makes a nice alternative to something like Swiss Family Robinson. William Crichton (Kenneth More) is the trusted and loyal Butler to the Earl of Loam (Cecil Parker) and his family. After a potentially damaging scandal involving a suffragette meeting, Loam decides to take his family on holiday on his luxury yacht to get away from it all, taking along Crichton, his daughters Mary (Sally Ann Howes), Catherine (Mercy Haystead) and Agatha (Miranda Connell), clergyman John Treherne (Jack Watling), Lord Woolley (Gerald Harper) and servant Eliza Tweeney (Diane Cilento). But the yacht goes off course and is shipwrecked, leaving them stranded, but Crichton is on hand to help out and provide the clueless family with food and supplies. The Loam family are so used to having things done for them, but here, the tables turn, and they have to learn to survive. Gilbert gets the best from his cast, More plays Crichton with a beat deadpan approach, and it's very funny. To see how they survive on the island for so long is great fun to watch, (filmed in Bermuda). It's a shame you don't get family entertainment like this now, this is a nostalgic look at how entertaining films should be done. 4/5



To Rome With Love (2012), Woody Allen continues his sojourn around Europe, after London, Barcelona and Paris, This time, Woody goes to Rome for this fluffy and silly view of the Eternal City, done in 4 vignettes, 2 in Italian. It shows Woody still has the power to make people laugh and create good comedy, and he even appears in front of the camera for the first time since Scoop (2006). It beings with Jerry (Woody) and his wife Phyllis (Judy Davis) coming to Rome to meet their daughter Hayley (Alison Pill) and her fiance Michelangelo (Flavio Parenti), but Jerry finds Michelangelo's father has an amazing talent. Then newlyweds Antonio (Alessandro Tiberi) and Milly (Alessandra Mastronardi) get lost in Rome, and Antonio ends up with prostitute Anna (PenÚlope Cruz). American architect John (Alec Baldwin) ends up befriending student Jack (Jesse Eisenberg) and his girlfriend Sally (Greta Gerwig), and gives advice when Jack falls for Sally's friend Monica (Ellen Page). Then, family man and clerk Leopoldo (Roberto Benigni) wakes up one morning to find he's somehow become a celebrity, being followed around by the paperazzi wanting to know menial little things about his life. It's a very silly film, but it's laugh out loud funny. The cast all give brilliant performances, even the Italians, and Woody gets all the best dialogue. He's been missed, and it's good to have him back acting. It's beautifully filmed though, and it brings out a lovely and vivid, sunny side to Rome. It shows Woody, even at 76, is still one of the greats working today. 4.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:05 am

How To Steal A Million (1966), directed by William Wyler (Mrs. Miniver (1942), The Big Country (1958) and Ben-Hur (1959)), this is a bubbly and light romantic crime-comedy, with some good chemistry between it's stars and a good cast to boot. It's also a good time piece, showing how heist films were done back in the days before thieves resorted to using computers and mobile phones, the old fashioned way was best. In Paris, Nicole Bonnet (Audrey Hepburn) lives with her father Charles Bonnet (Hugh Griffith), who is an art forger. His home is filled with lots of forged artworks like Van Gogh's, and a forged statue of Venus, and the latter is loaned out to a museum in Paris. One night, Nicole catches English thief Charles Bonnet (Peter O'Toole) trying to steal one of the Van Gogh's her father forged, she sends him packing. But, when American art collector Leland Davis (Eli Wallach) comes to Paris wishing to acquire the statue, Nicole worries that her father will be exposed as an arts forger. But, Nicole asks Charles for help, to try and steal back the statue, but security at the museum is high with regular patrols, but Charles has a way to get the statue. It's a good, fun film even if the actual heist goes on for far too long. It has a good cast, and Hepburn is beautiful as always, and O'Toole is charming and suave as the thief, with Hugh Griffith having fun as the forger father, and Eli Wallach as the posh arts dealer, plus it has a light caperish score by John Williams, predating what he would do with Catch Me If You Can. 3.5/5



Harper (1966), directed by Jack Smight (Kaleidoscope (1966) and The Illustrated Man (1969)), based on The Moving Target by
Ross Macdonald, and adapted by William Goldman, this is a good, jazzy detective story with a good ensemble. It has a good lead and some good cinematography, with a light jazzy score by Johnny Mandel. It's a long film, but it pays off well. In Los Angeles, down and out private detective Lew Harper (Paul Newman) is assigned by rich socialite Mrs. Sampson (Lauren Bacall) to help find her missing husband, who she believes is off philandering with another woman. Harper meets Sampson's teenager daughter Miranda (Pamela Tiffin) and her suave boyfriend Allan Taggart (Robert Wagner). Harper's investigations take him from druggie jazz singer Betty Fraley (Julie Harris) to washed up, overweight entertainer Fay Esterbrook (Shelly Winters) and onto bogus New Age preacher Claude (Strother Martin). Nothing is what it seems, and Harper ends up in a web of lies, going round in circles, but Allan is on hand to help out with the case, and Harper ends up getting roughed up by people who don't want him getting too close. It's a good detective story, mark the crossroads between the old film noirs and what was to come with the likes of Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye (1973). Newman exudes a natural coolness, and he's likeable and tough too. You can see why he was a great actor from this, and he had a good support to back him up. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:05 am

The Philadelphia Story (1940), directed by George Cukor (A Star Is Born (1954) and My Fair Lady (1964)) and based on a play which opened a year previously written by Philip Barry, this is a light and breezy romantic comedy, with some brilliant dialogue and an amusing little love triangle at it's core, played out by the two top actors and top actress of it's day, and they don't disappoint. There's brilliant chemistry between them and the rest of the cast. Rich Philadelphia socialite Tracy Samantha Lord (Katharine Hepburn) divorced her husband C. K. Dexter Haven (Cary Grant) because he did not meet up to her standards, and he was a drunkard. 2 years pass, and she is about to marry again, this time to George Kittredge (John Howard), a "nouveau riche man of the people". Spy magazine publisher Sidney Kidd (Henry Daniell) wants to cover the wedding, so he sends reporter Macaulay Connor (James Stewart) and photographer Liz Imbrie (Ruth Hussey) to the Lord family estate, Tracy reluctantly lets them report, but matters are further complicated when Haven turns up at the house, Tracy's parents Seth (John Halliday) and Margaret (Mary Nash) welcome him back, and Macaulay falls for Tracy. It's a well made film, it has the hallmarks of a screwball comedy, but it's a lot more classy to be one, and it has a nice romantic feel to it. But the dialogue is well written, and Grant, Hepburn and Stewart spark brilliantly off one another, (Stewart won an Oscar for his turn). It's a film from the 1940's, but it hasn't aged a day. 4/5



Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), based upon the Pulitzer Prize winning play by Tennessee Williams, and directed by Richard Brooks (Elmer Gantry (1960) and $ (1971)), this is a powerful drama with 3 brilliant performances at the centre of it. While Williams disliked the film because it toned down the some of the more mature qualities of the play, it's still a good film to watch, never forgetting it's theatrical roots. In Mississippi, Brick Pollitt (Paul Newman) and his wife Maggie (Elizabeth Taylor) return to his family's plantation to celebrate the 65th birthday of his father, Harvey "Big Daddy" Pollitt (Burl Ives). Brick is an alcoholic, and he recently broke his foot while trying to hurdle in the dark, and he spends most of the day inside drinking. Big Daddy has just returned from the hospital after having a cancer scare, and Big Mama (Judith Anderson) tells everyone that Big Daddy is not dying from cancer, but that's not true, because Big Daddy IS dying from cancer, but he doesn't know that. Brick finds out, and tensions between Big Daddy and Brick reach breaking point, because of Brick's drinking. It's a powerful drama, and it's a picture of an old fashioned side to America. Newman and Taylor give brilliant performances, but it's Burl Ives who steals the show as Big Daddy, this man is such a force of nature. It's a shame he won an Oscar for The Big Country (1958) over this, as he gave a superior performance in this. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:06 am

Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993), Woody Allen's reputation was at stake around the time of this films making, due to a crippling, unfair and opportunistic court case. But, despite such controversies, he was still knocking his films out, and he made a sort of throwback to his "early, funny ones" with this film, which was based upon an aborted sub-plot from Annie Hall (1977), the result was one of Woody's funniest films of the 90's. It has long married couple Larry and Carol Lipton (Woody and Diane Keaton), who meet their long time neighbours Paul and Lillian House (Jerry Adler and Lynn Cohen) one evening and become friends. The next day, they discover Lillian died of a heart attack, but Paul's explanation of how she died doesn't seem to add up. Carol decides to investigate further, with the help of Ted (Alan Alda), much to the ire of Larry, who is in a close friendship with writer Marcia (Anjelica Huston), and the suspicions of murder get weird, and nothing is quite what it seems, especially when a double of Lillian House is seen walking the streets, and Carol finds out she's staying at a run down hotel across Manhattan. It's an underrated film from Woody Allen, made at a tough time in his career, but it makes for an enjoyable watch. It is blessed with good performances and some very good dialogue, with Woody getting the best zingers again. Oh, and look out for a cameo from a young Zach Braff as the Lipton's son Nick. Razz 4/5



ParaNorman (2012), produced by Laika, the Oregon based animation studio who did the beautiful horror animation Coraline (2009), this is a funny and touching zombie story directed by British animator Sam Fell (Flushed Away (2006) and The Tale of Despereaux (2008)). This is one of three horror themed animations to be out this year along with Hotel Transylvania and Frankenweenie. But, this is first, and it's a colourful and inventive film. In Blithe Hollow, Massachusetts. Norman Babcock is a lonely boy, shunned and bullied at school, but he has a special gift, he can see ghosts and talk to the dead, he can see his dead Grandma (Elaine Stritch), but his father Perry (Jeff Garlin) is very scornful of him talking to the dead. Norman makes friends with fat eccentric kid Neil Downe (Tucker Albrizzi) who believes in his gift. Norman's eccentric uncle Mr. Prenderghast (John Goodman) who lives in a rundown cabin and has an interest in Norman says he'll need it to save Blithe Hollow from a witches curse that was placed on the town 300 years before, and it's not long before a zombie invasion takes over the town, and Norman has to save the day. It's very inventive, and it's got a good vocal cast, also including Casey Affleck, Anna Kendrick, Jodelle Ferland, Leslie Mann, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and Bernard Hill. It's got a touch of Tim Burton about it, but it keeps it's feelings and emotions down to earth, it's got a good amount of scares and it's good that there's scary films being made for kids, plus there's nods and winks to horror films like Halloween and Friday the 13th made. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:06 am

Pink Flamingos (1972), John Waters was just a local filmmaker who had made short underground films, before moving up to trashy yet controversial films like Mondo Trasho (1969) and Multiple Maniacs (1970). For his next film, he pulled out all the stops, and it would turn him into a cult icon of underground cinema. The film is still shocking 40 years later, and it has the power to repulse, but it is funny as well. Babs Johnson (Divine) has the alias of Divine and also has the reputation as being "the filthiest person alive", but she lives a quiet existence in a trailer in a bit of woodland outside Baltimore along with her egg-loving mother Edie (Edith Massey), delinquent son Crackers (Danny Mills), and traveling companion Cotton (Mary Vivian Pearce). Across town, jealous perverts Connie Marble (Mink Stole) and her husband (David Lochary) run an illegal black market baby ring, selling babies mothered by kidnapped girls to lesbian couples. The Marble's believe they have the claim to being the filthiest people alive, and they go about taunting Babs, sending her shit in the mail and torching her trailer to the ground. But, Babs isn't going to go out without a fight, and holds a kangaroo court. It's a sickening film, but it's one you have to see, the uncut NC-17 rated version can shock the most hardened viewer, and Waters has Divine do some unspeakably sick stuff, and even Crackers does something horrible with a chicken, (cut out of the UK version). You'll feel dirty for watching it, but it's a good kind of dirty, you've gone beyond the point of no return and you won't be the same after seeing it. 4/5



Sal˛, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), written and directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini, who had just come off doing his "Trilogy of Life" with The Decameron (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972) and Arabian Nights (1974). Pasolini adapted Marquis de Sade's book written in 1785, but was also inspired by Dante's Divine Comedy. It's a shocking film and you cannot believe Pasolini got away with this at the time, but it's got a raw energy that's hard to ignore. Set in Mussolini's Fascist Italy in 1944, in the Republic of Sal˛. The Duke (Paolo Bonacelli), the Bishop (Giorgio Cataldi), the Magistrate (Umberto Paolo Quintavalle), and the President (Aldo Valletti) agree to marry each other's daughters as part of some deranged ritual, which also involves kidnapping 9 young men and 9 young women, also to be joined by 4 middle aged prostitutes, who tell pornographic stories to arouse the Duke, the Bishop, the Magistrate and the President. The kidnapped men and women undergo 120 days of sexual torture, both physical and mental, and it's in stages, including the circles of Manias, Shit and Blood. It's not a film you can love, it's a film you can admire for it's technical qualities, like the sets by Dante Ferretti and costumes by Danilo Donati, but it's unwatchable in places, (it was banned in the UK and Australia and United Artists refused to release it in America), and it has a tragic quality as Pasolini was assassinated by a deranged fan days before the film opened in Italy. It's a good swansong for this daring and dangerous director. 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:36 am

I love that septic tank quote on the Pink Flamingos poster Laughing Laughing


I really can't stand Salo at all. The unpleasantness of it all doesn't bother me that much, it's just a really naff film.

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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Wed Sep 19, 2012 1:47 am

Wait until you see the uncut Pink Flamingos, you'll re-evaluate Salo then!! Shocked Razz
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Wed Sep 19, 2012 11:08 am

Is that R1 only?

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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Wed Sep 19, 2012 11:17 am

Wild Strawberries (1st view) - Probably the most light-hearted Ingmar Bergman film I've seen and his films continue to impress - 4/5*





The Hangover Part II (1st view) - I can't remember that much about the first film, possibly with good reason, but this had some chucklesome moments - 3/5*




Lawless (1st view) - Apart from Guy Pearce's comical villain this was pretty great - 4/5*


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:15 am

Gimli The Avenger wrote:
Is that R1 only?

Yeah, but its cheap! Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Thu Sep 20, 2012 7:59 am

Might give it a go!

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So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sun Sep 23, 2012 4:05 am

You, The Living (1st view) - Swedish comedy drama that features 50 short sketches, some of them interlinking, and most dealing with the downside of life - 4/5*





The Return (2nd view) - Ruissian drama about two brothers who are reunited with their father after his 10 year absence - 4/5*



_________________
We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Sep 24, 2012 7:59 am

Peeping Tom (3rd view) - Masterful thriller from Michael Powell, by far the best of his film that I've seen - 4/5




Midnight Run (3rd view) - Whatever happened to Charles Grodin? And why can't De Niro make films as good as this any more? - 4/5


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Tue Sep 25, 2012 1:14 pm

Saints and Soldiers: Airborne Creed (1st view) - Saints and Soldiers is something of a minor WWII classic for me. This prequel doesn't match it in any way but I can think of worse ways to spend 90 minutes.





Ran (1st view) - Undeniably a good film but something of a hard film to feel anything towards. The central battle scene is magnificent and the visuals are often gorgeous though. Of the three Kurosawa films Ive seen this comes second - 4/5*


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Thu Sep 27, 2012 1:26 pm

Dead Man's Shoes (2nd view) - The final 10 minutes are great but it's a bit of a chore getting there - 3/5*





Van Helsing (4th view) - I'm sure I'm in the minority but I bloody love this film! - 4/5


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Sun Sep 30, 2012 4:04 am

Brazil (2nd view) - This has been one of my favourite films since I first saw it about 10 years ago so I don't really know why it's taken me so long to watch it again. It's absolutely brilliant. It might finally be time to get that 3 disc Criterion DVD.


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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 12:56 pm

The Jungle Book (10th+ view) - One of Disney's finest films, Great songs, great vocals - 4/5




Taxi Driver (3rd view) - De Niro and Foster are amazing and the atmosphere Scorcese creates is nothing short of astonishing - 4/5




You Instead (1st view) - Instantly forgettable romantic drama set at a rock festival - 2/5*




Psycho (6th view) - Not quite Hitchcock's best but a truly remarkable film in every way - 5/5






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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
The Lords of Unending Life.


Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:32 pm

The Sweeney (2012), directed by Nick Love (The Football Factory (2004), The Business (2006) and The Firm (2009)), and co-written with John Hodge (Shallow Grave (1994) and Trainspotting (1996)). This is a modern day take on the classic 1970's TV series created by Ian Kennedy Martin. It's a different kettle of fish to the original series, and it does rely on the main characters using modern technology, but it has a good plot and a good set piece or two. In London, The Sweeney is a nickname for the Flying Squad, a division of the Metropolitan police which deals with armed robberies and other heists. The team is led by Jack Regan (Ray Winstone) and his loyal, longtime partner George Carter (Ben Drew). They get results done by ignoring the rule book and getting down to the level of the crooks, using sheer brute force and police brutality if needs be, much to the exasperation of their guv Haskins (Damian Lewis). But, when a series of armed robberies happens across London, Regan suspects Allen (Paul Anderson), who used to do this sort of crime years ago but went off the radar, and matters are complicated when Ivan Lewis (Steven Mackintosh) is streamlining the office, and Jack is having an affair with Lewis' wife Nancy (Hayley Atwell). It's not perfect, but it has some good action set pieces for a low-budget film, like a shootout on Trafalgar Square and a car chase round a caravan park (which Top Gear directed. Razz) Love keeps the action high, and Winstone and Drew do what you'd expect, and they're a good partnership. 3.5/5



Two For The Money (2005), directed by D.J. Caruso (Disturbia (2007), Eagle Eye (2008) and I Am Number Four (2011)), this is a sports thriller focused on a part of the gambling world people don't know about, the world of Sports gambling, and how some people are only in it for the money. It's a good character drama, with two good leads, but it does drag on a bit in the middle and it could have been shorter. When football star Brandon Lang (Matthew McConaughey) suffers a career ending injury, he takes a job in handicapping football games for a magazine, predicting who will win certain ganes. His winning suggestions capture the attention of Walter Abrams (Al Pacino), head of a sports consulting organisation. Abrams has his own TV show called The Sports Advisors and he has Brandon go on the show, and Brandon's winning predictions make him a top draw on the show, but Walter's other number two man Jerry Sykes (Jeremy Piven) isn't happy at Brandon's rise to fame. But, it's not long before Brandon gets in over his head and is making dodgy and risky deals, and he ends up losing his touch and and it ends up marring his once strong friendship with Walter. It's a good character drama, but it is a bit cliched. Pacino is his usual self, yet McConaughey is able to hold his own against Pacino. Despite looking all flashy, it does suffer from weak plotting and as stated, sagging in the middle. 2.5/5



Striptease (1996), directed by Andrew Bergman (The Freshman (1990) and Honeymoon in Vegas (1992)), this was based on the 1993 book of the same name by Carl Hiaasen. This was a massively hyped film, and for a film which is supposed to be a sex comedy, it's laughs come in all the wrong places and it just comes across as both dull and over the top at the same time, and there are moments that are just embarrassing. In Florida, FBI secretary Erin Grant (Demi Moore) has lost her job, and in an unfair custody battle, has lost her daughter Angela (Rumer Willis) to ex-husband Darryl (Robert Patrick), who is drunken and irresponsible. In order to raise money for a retrial, Erin works at a Miami strip club called The Eager Beaver. One patron at the club is Congressman David Dilbeck (Burt Reynolds), who becomes addicted to Erin, and wants her to perform privately for him. Dilbeck's nearest advisors are worried of the dangers Dilbeck will get into because of this, but Erin has a plan to use Dilbeck to help get custody of her daughter back. However, when a dead body is found, someone who found dirt on Dilbeck, Erin finds herself in deep water. It came out a year after Showgirls, and there were comparisons, but NOTHING can compare to seeing Burt Reynolds in a leather cowboy suit greased up with Vaseline. Shocked There's nothing in this film you can take seriously, and that people actually went to see it is shocking. It would be a guiltly pleasure if it wasn't so dull. 2/5



Any Given Sunday (1999), directed by Oliver Stone, who co-wrote this sports film with John Logan, this is a powerful if overlong film about American football. Set in a world of fictional American teams, but it's well filmed and has a good cast. Stone has tackled Vietnam, politics, the media and finance in his films, and he's merciless when he shows the wheeling-dealing of what goes on behind the scenes and on the pitch. It focuses on the Miami Sharks, a once great football team who have fallen on hard times, and struggling to win. This puts pressure on their manager Tony D'Amato (Al Pacino), who has 30 years of experience in the business, and there's more bad news when his star quarterback Jack "Cap" Rooney (Dennis Quaid) is severely injured on the pitch, forcing D'Amato to call on substitute Willy Beaman (Jamie Foxx) to take Rooney's place while he recovers. Beaman is nervous, but he soon picks up confidence and becomes a well liked player, helping them win and regain ground. But, Beaman soon gets arrogant and selfish with his new found fame, much to the anger of D'Amato and club owner Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz), but Beaman learns the hard way about his behaviour. It's a powerful drama with some good performances and good cameos, also including LL Cool J, James Woods, Ann-Margret and Charlton Heston. Foxx holds his own against Pacino, who seems to be angry for most of the film, not Stone's best, but it's good. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:35 pm

Calamity Jane (1953), directed by David Butler (Tea for Two (1950), Lullaby of Broadway (1951)), this was a wild west musical which Warner Bros. devised after the success of Annie Get Your Gun (1950), It's a bit twee and dated now, but the musical numbers are well staged and the songs are good, ("Secret Love" would win an Oscar), but it's a more innocent depiction of what Calamity Jane was like. Calamity Jane (Doris Day) rides into Deadwood, South Dakota on a stagecoach and goes to the Golden Garter, a bar which entertains men with female entertainment. But they locals are non too pleased at the latest "female" entertainer, Francis Fryer (Dick Wesson), who is a female impersonator, Calamity Jane announces she will go to Chicago and bring singer Adelaid Adams (Gale Robbins) to the town to Deadwood. Jane finds her and persuades her to come to Deadwood, but it's not all it seems, Adelaid is really maid Katie Brown (Allyn McLerie), and the townspeople aren't happy, but Jane and Wild Bill Hickok (Howard Keel) persuade the towns people to give her a chance, which Katie does, and Katie falls for Francis. It's a fun western, and it's well filmed, and there is some choreography which health and safety officers would be against these days. Day has a likeable presence and she's very sassy and no nonsense, it's a world away from what the TV series Deadwood would depict Calamity Jane as. 3.5/5



Full Metal Jacket (1987), 7 years after The Shining (1980), Stanley Kubrick returned, and this time, he'd made a Vietnam War film, sadly it came out around the same time as Platoon (1986) and Hamburger Hill (1987), which dinted it's box-office. But, it's still one of the best Vietnam war films ever made, and despite what some people say, the second half of the film in Vietnam is just as powerful as the explosive first part. In Parris Island in North Carolina in 1967, a group of privates including Joker (Matthew Modine), Pyle (Vincent D'Onofrio) and Cowboy (Arliss Howard) are placed under the command of Gunnery Sergeant Hartman (R. Lee Ermey), who is brutal and draconian. He particually picks on the bumbling Pyle, who can't seem to anything right, but just as it looks like Pyle is starting to show improvement, he goes psycho. A few months later, Joker is in Vietnam and writing for Stars and Stripes magazine, and he is sent from Da Nang up to Hue just in time for the Tet Offensive, and there he's reunited with Cowboy and he meets the gung-ho Animal Mother (Adam Baldwin). Kubrick would famously not travel outside the UK, so his Vietnam ranges from Sussex and Norfolk to the Docklands or London, and it's bloody convincing too. He gets the best out of his cast, and he handles the action scenes well, with the climactic battle being bloody and quite suspenseful. 4.5/5



The French Lieutenants Woman (1981), directed by Karel Reisz (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) and Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966)), adapted from John Fowles' 1969 novel and adapted by Harold Pinter. This is a moving and lavish period drama with a twist and a parallel. It's a quite original way of telling a story, but it requires attention and it has some lovely performances in it. This tells the story of biologist Charles (Jeremy Irons), who lives in the South of England in the 19th Century, who is engaged to marry Ernestina Freeman (Lynsey Baxter), who is part of a rich dynasty. But when Charles meets the mysterious Sarah (Meryl Streep), who appeared in the coastal town of Lyme Regis out of nowhere one day, his life changes forever and Charles falls in love with Sarah. However, he has to wonder whether to abandon the engagement he has. Meanwhile, we see the story being filmed, with actors Mike (Irons) and Anna (Streep), who have an affair during principal photography, even though they're both married. It is a lavish romance, even through it's been done loads of times before but with the modern day scenes make a good parallel, and it's well filmed and Reisz gets the best. It's success helped get Irons get into cinema and onto Hollywood, and it has a good supporting cast including Peter Vaughn, Leo McKern, Liz Smith and Penelope Wilton. 3.5/5



Lolita (1997), the second adaptation of Vladimir Nabakov's novel after Stanley Kubrick's 1962 take. This version was done by Adrian Lyne, and was a lot more faithful to the original novel. It's lavish, and despite what happens in the film, it's done with a delicate and sensitive touch. But, despite controversy, it was never released widely in American cinemas and sank without trace, which is a shame, as it didn't deserve that. It begins in 1947 when English professor Humbert Humbert (Jeremy Irons) comes to New Hampshire to teach a college course in French. He lives in the house of Charlotte Haze (Melanie Griffith) as a tenant. Humbert meets Charlotte's 14 year old daughter Dolores (Dominique Swain), who is known as Lolita. Humbert has had an obsession with "nymphets" since he was a boy, and he see's Lolita as one as she flirts with Humbert. After Charlotte is accidentally run over, he and Lolita escape across country into the Deep South, to be closer to her, but Humbert finds himself being followed, and he fears for the safety of himself and Lolita. It's impossible to "like" this film because of what Humbert does to Lolita, but you can admire it for it's acting, cinematography and Ennio Morricone score, and even though you see Humbert's intentions, it doesn't dive into graphic detail. It also has an offbeat touch, and it's a road movie at heart, with brilliant performances from Irons and Swain. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:36 pm

Wild Things (1998), directed by John McNaughton (Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1990) and Mad Dog and Glory (1993)), this is a clever and blackly comic erotic thriller which manages to pull the rug out from under the viewers feet more than once. It requires a little attention, but it has a game cast with some game leads and a couple of cameos who manage to nearly steal the film from everyone else. In Florida. Womanising High School guidance counsellor Sam Lombardo (Matt Dillion) is accused of rape by two students Kelly Van Ryan (Denise Richards) and Suzie Toller (Neve Campbell). Kelly's family are very wealthy indeed, and her mother Sandra Van Ryan (Theresa Russell) hires successful lawyer Tom Baxter (Robert Vaughn) to do the case, while Lombardo's only hope is cheapo lawyer Kenneth Bowden (Bill Murray) to defend him. But, Lombardo gets lucky when Suzie admits they made it up to get revenge on Lombardo. In the end, Lombardo is given a huge check for libel, making him and Bowden rich, but police detective Ray Duquette (Kevin Bacon) knows somethings not right about the whole case. It's a good thriller which requires attention, but it pays off in the end and it has one or two memorable moments that stand out. But it has a good script that has all the hallmarks of a morality play, about the absolute corruption of greed, and how it makes monsters of us all. Murray nearly steals the film as the wheeler-dealer lawyer. 4/5



The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000), directed by Robert Redford, whose style of directing can be compared to fellow actor/director Clint Eastwood, an unfussy style that's to the point. This is a sentimental, slushy fantasy based on Steven Pressfield's 1995 book of the same name, which in turn was based on the Hindu sacred text of Bhagavan (see what they did there??) It's got good intentions, but it's quite dull, and the cast should have known better. In 1930, in Savannah, Georgia, the Great Depression has hit the country hard, and heiress Adele Invergordon (Charlize Theron) wants to regain her fortune, so she organises a two day, four-round golfing tournament, which includes world champions Bobby Jones (Joel Gretsch) and Walter Hagan (Bruce McGill), and former local champion Rannulph Junuh (Matt Damon) who after serving in WW1, has been reduced to a burnt-out drunk. Rannulph reluctantly agrees to take part, and while trying to train, he meets the mysterious Bagger Vance (Will Smith), who is able to coach him back into shape and help Rannulph confront his demons. This is a very old fashioned film which wouldn't have been out of place in the 1930's or 40's, but it doesn't seem to work today. It just feels quite dull, and there should have been chemistry between the stars, but there isn't any despite good intentions. On a poignant note, this was Jack Lemmon's final film. 2.5/5



Killing Them Softly (2012), directed by Andrew Dominik, (Chopper (2000) and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)), this is based on the 1974 novel Cogan's Trade by George V. Higgins. This is a slow-burning thriller updated to when the Recession hit everyone, but it has the feel and look of a 70's thriller, it's a slow-burner and requires a bit of patience but it pays off in the end. Set in New Orleans in the fall of 2008, when Obama was running for the White House, two small time thieves Frankie (Scoot McNairy) and Russell (Ben Mendelsohn) rob a high-stakes gangster controlled poker game for gangster Dillon (Sam Sheperd). Gangster Markie Trattman (Ray Liotta) is the prime suspect, as he organised a similiar hold up a few years before, but mob enforcer Jackie Cogan (Brad Pitt) is hired to investigate by a mob driver (Richard Jenkins). Cogan brings New York mobster Mickey (James Gandolfini) to help, but he's useless. So Cogan has to do it all himself. It's a short film, but it feels long, but not that it makes it a bad film, but the trailers gave away all the action scenes that happen in this film. It's an old fashioned action thriller with some brilliant scenes, like a slo-mo shoot out in a car in the rain, and a drug-addled scene where the camera zones in and out. Pitt is amazing though, showing a quiet hardass attitude. 4/5



Predator (1987), directed by John McTiernan (Die Hard (1988), The Hunt For Red October (1990) and Last Action Hero (1993)), this was originally pitched as a Rocky spoof, which would see a boxer up against an alien, but from there it evolved, although it did keep one reference to Rocky. It got the top action star of the time, who helped fine tune the script with McTiernan to make it a taut suspense film with a sci-fi touch. It's still great fun. It begins with a spaceship crash landing in the jungle, and a team consisting of Major Alan "Dutch" Schaefer (Arnold Schwarzenegger), George Dillon (Carl Weathers), Mac Eliot (Bill Duke), Blain Cooper (Jesse Ventura), Billy Sole (Sonny Landham), Jorge "Poncho" Ramirez (Richard Chaves) and Rick Hawkins (Shane Black). They're flown into the jungle to hunt for whatever landed, and they find another downed helicopter before they meet local girl Anna (Elpidia Carrillo) who joins them. But whatever is out there is picking them off one by one, and it can go invisible and has thermal imaging sight. It's a great suspense film, and it has some very memorable moments and some great moments of action, with Arnie showing tenacity and strength against this creature. It's setting keeps the action contained and even the special effects and creature (created by Stan Winston) are convincing for their day, and could still pass as groundbreaking now. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched: Part 3 - The Search for Spock   Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:37 pm

Monster's Inc. (2001), Pixar's 4th film, and this was their most original concept up until that time, after the triple whammy of Toy Story (1995), A Bug's Life (1998) and Toy Story 2 (1999), Pixar hit their stride with this film. This is a bright and colourful film with so much invention on display, and brilliant characters with a flawless vocal cast to go with the , it's up there in Pixar's top 5 best films. It focuses on the premise that monsters in the closet do exist, and they all live in the parallel city of Monstropolis, and the entire city is powered by the screams created by children when they see a monster come out of the closet. The top scarer is James P. "Sulley" Sullivan (John Goodman) and his assistant Mike Wazowski (Billy Crystal), but Sulley has a rivalry with Randal Boggs (Steve Buscemi) but Sulley is favoured by boss Henry P. Waternoose III (James Coburn). One night, Sulley discovers Randal has been working overtime and a door is activated on the factory floor, and a little girl known as Boo (Mary Gibbs) has walked through it into Monstropolis, and Mike and Sulley have to get the door back and her Boo home. It's such a sweet film too but it has such a great deal of imagination on display. Crystal is a fine choice for the wisecracking Mike Wazowski, while Goodman is a big softy as Sulley and Buscemi is brilliantly slimy as Boggs. It's heartwarming and very original, and a sheer delight to watch. 5/5



Primary Colors (1998), directed by Mike Nichols (The Graduate (1967), Catch-22 (1970) and The Birdcage (1996)), and adapted from the 1996 book by Joe Klein (credited as Anonymous), this is a biting political satire which came out when Bill Clinton was being scrutinised for the Monica Lewinsky scandal. The fact that it's stars actually resemble the Clintons make this a bit too close to home for comfort, but it's still a good film. It has political idealist Henry Burton (Adrian Lester) being asked to join the campaign of Governor Jack Stanton (John Travolta), who is running for the Democratic candidate of the U.S. Presidency. By Jack's side is his wife Susan (Emma Thompson), redneck political strategist Richard Jemmons (Billy Bob Thornton), Daisy Green (Mauria Tierney) and Howard Ferguson (Paul Guilfoyle). All seems to be going well, but when a sex scandal threatens to harm Stanton's campaign, Burton finds himself with tough "dustbuster" Libby Holden (Kathy Bates) to help clear up the mess, and there's a lot of it. It's a good film, and Nichols has fun with the cutthroat world of campaigning, even if it did alienate cinemagoers at the time. With Travolta and Thompson doing good Clinton impressions, Lester beautifully underplaying his part as the novice and Bates nearly stealing the film. It has brilliant support from Rob Reiner, Tony Shalhoub, Diane Ladd and Larry Hagman. 4/5



Cellular (2004), directed by David R. Ellis (Snakes on a Plane (2006) and The Final Destination (2009)), this is a tight and slightly amusing and knowing thriller. It has a good cast and even some good set pieces, even if it comes across as a bit silly but it shares DNA with the likes of Speed (1994) and Phone Booth (2002). When biology teacher Jessica Martin (Kim Basinger) is kidnapped by a group of brutal men led by Ethan (Jason Statham, attempting an American accent), she's locked in an attic with a broken telephone. However, Jessica is able to piece the phone back together and she randomly calls the cell phone of Ryan (Chris Evans), an irresponsible slacker who has just been dumped. He believes the call to be a hoax, but Jessica is able to convince him to go to the police station and report it, telling Desk Sergeant Mooney (William H. Macy) about it. Meanwhile, Ethan tells Jessica that he plans to kidnap her son Ricky (Adam Taylor Gordon), and that her husband Craig (Richard Burgi) will be next as he has something Ethan and his gang want. But, he's just an architect, but Ryan is on a race against time to help Jessica, and his phone battery is dying. It's a good film, and it stays to the point, even if Basinger spends most of the film looking distraught and confused, and Statham's comedy American accent is laughable. Evans makes a good cocky action hero. It might not be original, but you could do worse than watch this. 3.5/5



Bad News Bears (2005), directed by Richard Linklater, this is a remake of the 1976 film directed by Michael Ritchie which starred Walter Matthau. For the remake, Linklater uses the same comic sense of humour he used in School of Rock (2003) for this version. It works thanks to a good lead performance, and a good cast of kids. Set in Burbank, California. It has it has drunken pool cleaner and former baseball player Morris Buttermaker (Billy Bob Thornton), taking on the job to coach little league baseball team The Bears, who are a bunch of absolute misfits, and couldn't play baseball for toffee, and they're focused on doing anything other than playing baseball. Noticing they have absolutely no chance at any success, Buttermaker recruits his former girlfriends daughter Amanda Wurlitzer (Sammi Kane Kraft), who is an excellent pitcher and local motorcycling troublemaker Kelly Leak (Jeffrey Davies) who is a brilliant athlete and can throw a ball far. Despite a bad start, Buttermaker fills the team with confidence to take on the local rivals The Yankees, led by coach Roy Bullock (Greg Kinnear), whose team is much more civilised, but harder-nosed than the Bears. It's a funny comedy, with a lot more un-PC jokes than the 1976 original, but it has a funny script by Glenn Ficarra and John Requa, (who worked with Thornton on Bad Santa (2003)), even if nearly a shot-for-shot remake, (Linklater tried to film it on as many of the same locations the original was made), but it's still amusing. 3.5/5

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