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 What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again

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Donald McKinney
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Tue Jun 06, 2017 10:24 pm

I just happened to be in Leeds when it was on.
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Fri Jun 30, 2017 6:52 pm

Mindhorn (2016), the directorial debut of theatre director and actor Sean Foley, whose play The Play What I Wrote won awards and acclaim. This crime-comedy spoof was written by Julian Barratt and Simon Farnaby, and it has a lot of targets in sight. First are old shows like Bergerac and The Six Million Dollar Man, the other is the profession of acting as a whole. The result has more than a touch of Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa (2013) about it, but there are some laughs to be had throughout, even if it does come across as a bit uneven and wobbly. During the late 80's and early 90's, actor Richard Thorncroft (Barratt) was renowned for the TV series Mindhorn, where he played Detective Bruce Mindhorn, who had a cybernetic eye which could determine whether people were telling the truth. 25 years after the show ended, Thorncroft is washed up, and is now doing voiceovers for ads. Meanwhile, on the Isle of Man, where the show was made, there's been a series of murders committed and escaped convinct Paul Melly (Russell Tovey) is wanted for it, only he's demanding to speak to Detective Mindhorn. So, the police ask Thorncroft to help them, Thorncroft agrees, but when he returns to the Isle of Man, he finds he's less than welcome after making disparaging remarks about the place 25 years previously, plus his former co-star Peter Eastman (Steve Coogan) is riding high in the spin-off series from Mindhorn, and Thorncroft's female co-star Patricia Deville (Essie Davis) is now living with Thorncroft's stunt double Clive Parnevik (Farnaby). Meanwhile, Thorncroft finds a video tape with incriminating evidence on it. It's a daft comedy which makes the most of the Isle of Man, which acts as a character in the film, and it satirises the cult of old detective TV shows, but melding Bergerac and The Six Million Dollar Man together sounds like a weird way to go, but Barratt has fun in the lead role, and there's also a few fun cameos to be found in the film too. 3/5



Miss Sloane (2016), directed by John Madden (Mrs Brown (1997), Shakespeare in Love (1998) and The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011)), this is a taut, suspenseful political thriller set in cutthroat world of lobbyists in Washington. Perhaps due to the political nature of the subject, and how close to home it was. This struggled to find financing in Hollywood, but thanks to the determination of it's director and star, they found money to make it in France. It's a good thriller, cold and steely, like it's protagonist, but still compelling nonetheless. Elizabeth Sloane (Jessica Chastain) is one of the most powerful and feared lobbyists in Washington, she's able to use stealthlike tactics and maneuvers to win support of various subjects in Washington. She works for lobbying firm Cole Kravitz & Waterman, but after a conflict of interest regarding lobbying against a bill on gun checks, she's lured by Rodolfo Schmidt (Mark Strong), the head of rival lobbying firm Peterson Wyatt, to join his firm, and support said bill. Sloane leaves Cole Kravitz & Waterman for pastures new at Peterson Wyatt, taking most of the lobbying team from her old job with her. Sloane selects Esme Manucharian (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) to be in charge of the firms media appearances, and Sloane finds out that Esme was a victim of a high school shooting. While Sloane promises not to make this public, she soon breaks this promise and lets it out on live TV. This ends up having devastating consequences for all concerned after a near miss gun attack and revelations about Sloane's tactics and practices have her hauled before a congressional hearing. While this does require a lot of patience, it's well worth sticking with, mainly for Chastain's powerhouse performance, which she plays with icy demeanour and determination. A lot of Washington based political thrillers are hard sells, as everyone gets enough politics as it is, but when it's as explosive as this is, then it's well worth seeing. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:39 pm

Carnal Knowledge (1971), directed by Mike Nichols and written by written by Jules Feiffer. This came about when Nichols was sent the script by Feiffer as a potential play, but Nichols convinced Feiffer to rework it as a film, believing it would work better that way. Plus, Nichols was wanting to make a smaller, simpler film after the nightmarish production of Catch-22 (1970), and it makes for a frank, focused and stark character piece. Set over 25 years from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. It follows two college roommates, the loud and aggressive Jonathan Fuerst (Jack Nicholson) and the quiet, thoughtful Sandy (Art Garfunkel). It follows their experiences with women. In college, Sandy dates Susan (Candice Bergen), but she's reluctant to get physical, but she does with Jonathan behind Sandy's back. Jump forwards a few years, and Susan and Sandy are married, while Jonathan is now dating Bobbie (Ann-Margret), and it's a physical relationship, but he finds it no more satisfying than having a more intellectual relationship. Meanwhile, Sandy and Susan split, and Sandy starts dating Cindy (Cynthia O'Neal) and then Jennifer (Carol Kane), but after Bobbie tries to commit suicide, Jonathan ends up losing his sex drive. It's a film which asks a lot of serious questions about sex, and people attitudes to sex, but it answers them in a thoughtful, intimate way without having to be gratuitous. It's graced with some good performances and focused cinematography by Giuseppe Rotunno. 4/5



Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazar's Revenge (2017), here we go again. 6 years after On Stranger Tides, Captain Jack Sparrow and his team are back, this time helmed by Norwegian directing duo Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg, (Kon-Tiki (2012)), this was initially set to have been a more intimate, cheaper film, but fate had other ideas, it's cost millions and over 2 years to film, it's the same old same old all over again. After a British Navy Ship is attacked by the undead Captain Salazar (Javier Bardem) and his undead crew, he kills all the crew but spares the life of Henry Turner (Brenton Thwaites) when Salazar discovers Henry is looking for Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp). Jack is struggling with looting and the like, he loses his crew, but he ends up crossing paths with Henry and local girl Carina Smyth (Kaya Scodelario), who has been accused of witchcraft. Henry needs Jack to help him find the Trident of Poseidon so that the curse on his father Will (Orlando Bloom) can be broken, and Carina knows the way, but Salazer is soon hot on their tails, and it's not long before Jack and Co. find themselves up against Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush), who unbeknownst to Jack, has actually promised Salazar that he'll find Jack. It's a daft adventure caper, and most of it's best bits happen in the first hour, like the bank robbery and the execution with the spinning guillotine. But, after this, it's time to wonder whether the franchise has finally had it's day, and maybe it's time to let it sail off into the sunset for good. 3/5


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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Fri Jun 30, 2017 8:47 pm

What's Up, Doc? (1972), directed by Peter Bogdanovich, who at the time was reveling from the success of The Last Picture Show (1971), as a result, he was offered to come and make a film for Warner Bros. Bogdanovich, who likes to homage the techniques and genres of bygone cinema, intended to make a screwball comedy in the same mold as Bringing Up Baby (1938) and His Girl Friday (1940). The result is a hilarious little farce which is still good to watch today. In San Francisco, the film focuses on the mix-ups caused by four identical plaid overnight bags, one is owned by Howard Bannister, Ph.D. (Ryan O'Neal) and contains igneous rocks, he's come with his overbearing fiance Eunice Burns (Madeline Kahn), another belongs to Mrs. Van Hoskins (Mabel Albertson), containing his jewels, another belongs to the mysterious Mr. Smith (Michael Murphy), and it contains top secret documents and the last belongs to kooky Judy Maxwell (Barbra Streisand), containing her clothes, and wherever she goes trouble happens. When Mr. Jones (Philip Roth) tries to get Mr. Smith's bag, but he ends up in trouble too. It's a very funny film, with Streisand and O'Neal handling the comedy really well, and the screwball comedy setting works brilliantly in the gaudy 1970's, and it has a hilarious chase sequence as well which is unbelievable, you won't get one like this made today. 4/5



A Street Cat Named Bob (2016), directed by Roger Spottiswoode (Turner & Hooch (1989), Air America (1990) and Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)), and adapted from James Bowen's 2010 memoir of the same name, which sprung even more books in the interim. Most of Hollywood descended on getting the rights to the book, but it was kept as a gentle low-budget drama, which was the right way to go. James Bowen (Luke Treadaway) is a homeless drug addict, who wants to get clean and make his way in life, he's a busker as well, making what he can from shrapnel thrown his way. His support worker Val (Joanne Froggatt), is sympathetic and wants to help James, and gives him a flat to live in, even though it's on a run down estate. One night, he thinks a burglar has got in, and he finds a ginger cat. The cat stays the night and James tries to find it's owner, when he can't he takes the cat in and names him Bob. He and Bob's lives intertwine, and in taking care of Bob, it helps James become a better person, and in taking Bob on his busking, and it draws in the punters as well earning them some money, and Bob helps James ask neighbour Betty (Ruta Gedmintas) on a date. It's tone might be a little jarring, moving from heavy drugs drama to light hearted caper with Bob's little escapades. But, the fact this is all true, (or mostly true with the film adaptation), but it makes for a very likable little film, with the real Bob playing himself in the film. Razz 3/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:02 pm

The Last Impresario (2013), the directorial debut of actress Gracie Otto, who had directed a few short films prior to this. This documentary came about after a chance encounter at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival, which she met theatre impresario and film producer Michael White, whose arrival got people's attention. That gave Otto the spark for this documentary, and it tells the story of the most famous man you've never heard of. Michael White was born in Glasgow, but he got his education in Switzerland and France, and he went into the theatre in London's West End, establishing himself as a producer who takes risks, and most of those risky productions turned out to be big hits, including the likes of Oh! Calcutta!, The Rocky Horror Show and A Chorus Line. White also made close friends with the likes of Jack Nicholson, Mick Jagger and John Lennon and Yoko Ono. In the 1970's, he moved into film production, producing the likes of Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), Jabberwocky (1977) and Polyester (1981). White also produced The Comic Strip Presents for TV as well. But the film also touches on his bankruptcy after being swindled out of millions, and the heart attack that followed, which led to him having to sell of his possessions. It's an incredible life of a man who took risks, and make courageous choices that other showmen wouldn't do. It's a shame White's career dwindled out under sad circumstances, as we need another Michael White to come back and blow the cobwebs off showbusiness. 4/5



Wonder Woman (2017), this is the one DC project that's been around for decades, after many false starts and years in development hell, William Moulton Marston's creation finally comes to the big screen courtesy of director Patty Jenkins (Monster (2003)), after being introduced on screen in last years Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016), Diana Prince gets her own film, and it's worth the wait. Diana Prince (Gal Gadot) was born and raised on the island of Themyscira, home to the Amazon race of warrior women led by Diana's mother, Queen Hippolyta (Connie Nielsen). Diana wants to fight, but Hippolyta forbids it, but Diana's aunt General Antiope (Robin Wright) teaches her in secret. When their peaceful lives are shattered when World War 1 American pilot Captain Steve Trevor (Chris Pine) crashes just off the coast, Diana saves him, but he's followed by a German cruiser. The Amazon's fight them off. Diana goes with Trevor to London to help with his mission regarding a gas that will kill millions being developed by General Erich Ludendorff (Danny Huston) and chemist Isabel Maru (Elena Anaya), they get a team together and head to the Front. It's a brilliant comic book adventure, and they've finally got a DC film right after Batman V Superman and Suicide Squad alienated viewers, mainly because this is a film that knows how to have fun, and it's buoyed by a very good story and cast. 4/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Sat Jul 01, 2017 12:21 am

Gumshoe (1971), the directorial debut of Stephen Frears, who at that time was directing for the BBC, and had been an assistant director on If.... (1968), it's producer Michael Medwin was impressed by Frears, and gave him a film to direct written by actor Neville Smith, Frears accepted. The result is a spoof of pulpy detective novels and old fashioned film noirs, and it's got a good cast to it's name as well. Set in Liverpool, it has bingo-caller and occasional club comedian Eddie Ginley (Albert Finney), who is a fantasist and dreams of being a private detective, so he puts out an advert in the Liverpool Echo, advertising his services. He's such a fan of detective stories and old novels of the sort, that he put out the advert as a birthday present to himself. Imagine Eddie's surprise when he gets a call for what appears to be an actual piece of detective work! He gets a package from a large man called De Fries (George Silver) containing a gun, a photograoh and a large sum of money, and it's not long before he's dragged into a seedy world of crime, drugs and politics, and he learns his seedy brother William (Frank Finlay), who ran off with Eddie's girlfriend Ellen (Billie Whitelaw), and soon it's not long before Eddie's life is in grave danger. It's a low budget comedy-drama, cut from similar cloth to what Bill Forsyth would be doing a decade later, but it's a slight affair, but it shows off Liverpool as it was in the early 1970's. It should have set Frears' career off then, but he didn't direct a feature film again until The Hit (1984). 3.5/5



Gold (2016), directed by Stephen Gaghan (Abandon (2002)and Syriana (2005)), and written by Patrick Massett and John Zinman, (Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) and TV's Friday Night Lights. This crime adventure was inspired by the true life 1993 Bre-X mining scandal. However, for legal reasons, names have been changed and a few story details were jiggled around too, but it still makes for a compelling tale. In 1988, Kenny Wells (Matthew McConaughey) runs a struggling prospecting company called Washoe, which is nearly broke and they're running the business out of the local bar where Kenny's girlfriend Kay (Bryce Dallas Howard) works. A vision comes to Kenny in a dream of a gold mine in deepest Indonesia, he flies out there and meets geologist Michael Acosta (Édgar Ramirez), who is struggling too but agrees to help Kenny. After putting everything he has into the mine, weeks go by and it looks like it's been all for nothing and Kenny comes down with malaria. But, they strike gold and more people invest in the gold mine, and the company moves to new premises. But Kay believes that there's something about this deal that isn't right, but Kenny scorns her concerns. But, when Wall Street become involved, it gets complicated. It's a good drama, buoyed with a strong lead performance by McConaughey, his third film to focus on a gold hunt, but it makes for a complex tale of corruption, betrayal and obsession. The story might be a bit all over the place and beefed up a bit for film, but it works, sort of. 3.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Sat Jul 01, 2017 12:59 am

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), after the flop of 1941 (1979), it looked like Steven Spielberg's career was in the toilet. Nope, he'd been developing a little action-adventure film produced and created by his best friend George Lucas. It would put Spielberg back on top and become one of the most successful films ever, and it also gave the world a new action hero, and one of the most popular film franchises ever. Set in 1936, it has travelling archaeology professor Henry 'Indiana' Jones (Harrison Ford) being assigned by the government to look for the Ark of Covenant, which contains the remains of the stone tablets of The Ten Commandments. Indiana is sent to Nepal, where he meets old flame Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen), who has an artifact crucial to finding the Ark, and they travel on to where out in the desert the Nazi's are also looking for the Ark. It's a race against time, as Indy's biggest rival Dr. René Belloq (Paul Freeman) is in league with the Nazi's, also looking for the Ark. It's a great piece of entertainment, with enough action, adventure and imagination to keep you glued for a couple of hours, Ford makes Indy his own, world weary but always on his toes. Spielberg has rarely been better than this. He was back on top, and more was to come!! 5/5



The Mummy (2017), directed by Alex Kurtzman, (People Like Us (2012)), and written by David Koepp (Jurassic Park (1993) and Christopher McQuarrie (The Usual Suspects (1995)), this well-meaning attempt at Universal to start their Dark Universe, bringing the old monsters back for a new generation. However, this take on The Mummy comes across as being cack-handed and very derivative too. In Iraq, soldier-of-fortune Nick Morton (Tom Cruise) and his partner Chris Vail (Jake Johnson) discover the lost tomb of Ahmanet, after an airstrike on insurgents reveals it's location. Nick and Chris team up with archaeologist Jennifer Halsey (Annabelle Wallis) and Colonel Greenway (Courtney B. Vance) to retrieve the sarcophagus. They place it on a cargo plane for England, but are attacked by a plague of crows which causes the plane to go down, Halsey parachutes out, and everyone is killed, expect Nick who wakes up in a morgue in Oxford. Ahmanet's mummy (Sofia Boutella) escapes from the sarcophagus and comes back to life, while Nick is visited by Dr. Henry Jekyll (Russell Crowe), leader of the Prodigium, who explains to Nick what's really going on, the purpose of the Prodigium, and why Nick is still alive after the plane crash. It's a daft blockbuster, but it looks like it's been overthought and the result is underwhelming, and it's been done before and it's been done better as well, even Cruise seems out of place in this. Meanwhile, Brendan Fraser, wherever he is, is probably laughing himself hoarse. 2/5



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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Sat Jul 01, 2017 11:46 am

I blinked and missed Mindhorn at the cinemas near me.


Pirates 5, I don't think anyone liked it quite as much as me Very Happy

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Mon Jul 24, 2017 1:33 pm

Really need to start posting again about films I watch, so my last few...


Hell Or High Water (1st view) - The fifth of this year's best picture nominess I've seen and quite easily the best (the others are Hacksaw Ridge, Hidden Figures, Arrival and La La Land). One of the most melancholy films I've seen in an age, it also manages to have it's biggest laugh and it's most depressing moment occur simultaneously, which is some feat - 4/5*





Spiderman: Homecoming (1st view) - Nestling around the halfway mark of the MCU films, this is easily the best Spiderman film and features the best Spiderman. Wasn't too keen on Holland when I first saw him in Civil War but he''s grown on me since and his ace here. As is, perhaps worringly, often the case now with MCU films, the villain is rather pants despite Keaton being good in the role but the rest of the film works just fine with two corking action scenes, a great comic relief sidekick, some pleasing cameos and plenty of nods to the MCU as a whole (more than any other film so far I think). Also, that final stinger is the best from the franchise so far. And once again my mind hurts with a film franchise and its continuity. 5 years is not 8 - 4/5*





Train To Busan (1st view) - Got a bit too maudlin for me near the end but this was largely excellent. Genuinely thrilling set pieces, good characters and unlike most zombie scenarios in which you'd have to be a total plonker to get eaten, the zombies here are an actual threat - 4/5*





Transformers: The Last Knight (1st view) - An unholy, god-awful mess of a film. Overlong, an incoherent and nonsensical plot, Anythony Hopkins picking up the easiest paycheck of his career and an astoundingly odd turn from Stanley Tucci as a drunken Merlin. And I bloody loved it! - 4/5*



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We renounce our Maker.
We cleave to the darkness.
We take unto ourselves the power and glory.
Behold! We are the Nine,
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Frakkin toasters!

So, what, the murder weapon was a top sirloin?

He's a klutz, Mrs. Landingham. Your president's a geek!
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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:07 pm

The Black Hole (1979), directed by Gary Nelson, (Freaky Friday (1976) and Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold (1986)), this film came to Disney a few years before as a spec script entitled Space Probe-One. Disney sat on it, then Star Wars (1977) opened, and Disney quickly greenlit it wanting to ride on the coattails of Star Wars' success. It's actually a good space opera even if it is a bit on the slow side. Set in 2130 A.D. An Earth exploratory ship, the USS Palomino, discovers a black hole with a lost ship, the USS Cygnus, missing for 20 years, nearing the black hole. The crew of the Palomino include Captain Dan Holland (Robert Forster) his First Officer Lieutenant Charlie Pizer (Joseph Bottoms), journalist Harry Booth, (Ernest Borgnine) and scientist and ESP-sensitive Dr. Kate McCrae (Yvette Mimieux), Dr. Alex Durant (Anthony Perkins) and a robot known as V.I.N.CENT. (voiced by Roddy McDowall). They board the ship and meet it's captain Dr. Hans Reinhardt (Maximilian Schell). McCrae's father had been one of the crew members, but is now dead. At first, Reinhardt is very welcoming to the crew, but it turns out he has no desire to be rescued, he wants to go through the black hole. Even though Holland and his crew try and reason with Reinhardt, his mind is made up, he's obsessed by what might lie on the other side of the black hole, and he's taken the crew of the Palomino prisoner, and they'll be going along as well, whether they want to or not. It's a good sci-fi film, and more engaging than the likes of John Carter or Jupiter Ascending. It has a touch of Silent Running about it's bones as well, even though it's effects are more primitive than Star Wars, it manages to do well with what it's got. 4/5



De Palma (2015), produced and directed by Noah Baumbach (The Squid and the Whale (2005), Margot at the Wedding (2007) and Greenberg (2010)) and Jake Paltrow (The Good Night (2007) and Young Ones (2014)), this documentary focuses on the career of one of the most prolific and exciting directors of the last 50 years, Brian De Palma, and this gives a great look at his films, told by the man himself. Brian De Palma tells us of his life, his upbringing and his influences on his films including Hitchcock. He started with short films thoughout the early to mid 1960's before branching out into full length films like Murder à la Mod (1968), Greetings (1968) and Hi, Mom! (1970), the latter two starring a young Robert De Niro. He got his foot in the door of Hollywood with Get to Know Your Rabbit (1972), Sisters (1973) and Phantom of the Paradise (1974). De Palma finally hit the big time when he was offered the chance to direct Carrie (1976), which would lead to The Fury (1978), Dressed to Kill (1980), Blow Out (1981), Scarface (1983), Body Double (1984), The Untouchables (1987) and Mission: Impossible (1996). The documentary also focuses on his little-known films like Home Movies (1980), Wise Guys (1986) and Redaction (2007). De Palma also tells of his disillusionment with the Hollywood system after making Mission to Mars (2000), where he was a last minute replacement, and why he's been avoiding the studio system ever since. It tells a good story of a long and colourful career, while De Palma might be accused of misogyny in some of his work, one thing is clear, no-one has more passion than he does when it comes to actually making films, and he still has a few more films up his sleeve. 4.5/5

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PostSubject: Re: What I've Just Watched Part 4: There And Back Again   Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:45 pm

Bloody Mama (1970), produced and directed by Roger Corman, this crime exploitation film was based on the life of Kate Barker, who along with her family was part of a violent crime spree in the American mid-west in the 1930's. Corman's version was shot fast and cheap on location in Arkansas, and it's a spirited and graphically violent caper film, but Corman has a good cast to work with here.  Kate 'Ma' Barker (Shelley Winters) had a troubled upbringing where she was beaten by her brothers and father, but what didn't kill her made her stronger, and by the 1930's, she has 4 sons, Arthur (Clint Kimbrough), Herman (Don Stroud), Fred (Robert Walden) and Lloyd (Robert De Niro). After she leaves her husband George (Alex Nicol), Ma decides to make her fortune by robbing banks, with her sons carrying out the crime. After Fred and Herman are jailed for a robbery gone awry, Ma recruits experienced gunman Kevin (Bruce Dern) to help get them out of jail, and continue their crime spree. But the lawmen are closing in, and Ma is living on borrowed time. Corman states Bloody Mama to have been his finest film, and it has some good moments of action. Think of this one as a Grindhouse version of Public Enemies, and you're just about there. It's worth seeing De Niro as Ma's heroin addicted younger son, a role he lost 30 pounds in weight for, but Winters is amazing. 4/5



Slade in Flame (1975), Slade were a huge band in the early 1970's, and they were offered the chance to make a film by Goodtimes Enterprises, which was co-owned by David Puttnam. They nearly did a Quatermass Experiment spoof called The Quite A Mess Experiment. But they opted for something a bit more gritty and realistic, they wanted to show what the music industry was really like. It alienated fans then, but it's amazing to watch. It begins in the 1960's, where two rival bands, one led by Jack Daniels (Alan Lake) and the other called The Undertakers, led by Stoker (Noddy Holder), get into quarrels. But, the two bands merge, with Charlie (Don Powell), Barry (Dave Hill) and Paul (Jim Lea) joining Stoker's new band called Flame, which is managed by the scheming Ron Harding (Johnny Shannon), who seems to take them for mugs, so Flame go with Robert Seymour (Tom Conti), a marketing man who has big plans for Flame. They do make it big, but they get involved in a shootout at a pirate radio station, and Harding pesters them violently, wanting a cut of their earnings. Directed by Richard Loncraine (The Missionary (1982), Richard III (1995)), this is the side of the music industry that record companies would rather you didn't know about, but Slade were brave and ballsy enough to expose it on screen at the time. You won't forget this one in a hurry, and it's a good companion piece with That'll Be The Day (1973). 4/5


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